Contents — June 2018

Spirit Volume 10, Issue 2.

In This Issue

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Editor’s Letter

Recharging Spiritual Batteries

Eight-minute read. A reminder not to forget to look after your volunteers (and yourself!) General Convention is almost upon us! That Wedding (and I have a whine.) Why you can expect to see more on Human Trafficking, and when May becomes June.  Read More 

Keeping Watch

A Message of Love

Five-minute read. The Presiding Bishop has handed us a gift in his Royal Wedding address, now it is up to us to make the best use of it. Read More 

Features

General Convention is Coming!

Ten-minute read. How General Convention works, and some idea of what to expect from the 79th Convention of The Episcopal Church. Read More 


General Convention 101

The Episcopal Diocese of Texas has produced a handy pictorial guide to General Convention. Follow the links provided to see an online version of the guide, which you can download and print if you wish.  Read More 


Human Trafficking as It Relates to Slavery

Ten-minute read. Most Americans turn a blind eye towards slavery believing it only existed in the past. Unfortunately, that is not the case. Read More 


Saint Francis Community Services Reach Out to Youth in Kansas City

five-minute read. Working in partnership with the school district and with the nursing programs at Kansas City Kansas Community College and Metropolitan Community College, Saint Francis Community Services focus on prevention by identifying potential health problems before they grow more serious. That includes mental health issues. Read More 


Youth Ministry

Five-minute read.A look back at my first year as diocesan Youth Ministry Coordinator plus an introduction to this summer's interns.  Read More 


How Can You Not Be Changed?

Ten-minute read. Part Two on Deepening Your Relationship with God by Worshiping with Other Faiths.  Read More 


Interview With Dean Peter DeVeau

Five-minute read. An interview with Dean Peter DeVeau, who recently concluded his ministry at Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral, Kansas City.  Read More 

News

An Extended Stay Safe House For Human Trafficking Victims

Two-minute read. We are ready to begin the next step in our plan: which is to open an extended-stay safe-house.  Read More 


Area Confirmations at Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral

Two-minute read. Saturday April 7, 2018, Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral, Kansas City hosted diocesan Area Confirmations. Taking part were members of St. Andrew's, Kansas City; Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral, Kansas City; St. Mary's Kansas City, St. Peter & All Saints, Kansas City; and Church of the Resurrection, Blue Springs.  Read More 


Area Confirmations at Grace Episcopal Church, Carthage

Two-minute read. On Saturday April 21, 2018, Grace Episcopal Church, Carthage hosted diocesan Area Confirmations. Taking part were members of Christ Church, Springfield; Grace, Carthage; St. Nicholas, Noel; St. Philips Joplin and All Saints, Nevada. Read More 


Area Confirmations at Calvary Episcopal Church, Sedalia

Two-minute read. On Saturday May, 5 2018, Calvary Episcopal Church, Sedalia hosted diocesan Area Confirmations. Taking part were members of Calvary, Sedalia; Christ Church, Warrensburg; and St. Peter's, Harrisonville. Read More 


Roanridge Trust Award Grants Announced For Innovative Leadership Development Programs

Five-minute read. The Roanridge Trust was established by the Cochel family, who originally gave a working farm in Missouri called Roanridge to The Episcopal Church.  Read More 

About

How to contact us, submit articles & pictures  About Spirit 

Directory

A directory of all the churches in the diocese  Directory 

Recharging Spiritual Batteries

Gary Allman Eight-minute read.   Resources

The Cross at Lake Kanuga Image: Gary Allman

It happens. It can happen without warning. A favorite activity, a food, a friend, even our spirituality and connection with God — we suddenly lose interest, become lost and we are left with a residue of obligations. It doesn’t have to happen quickly either. Sometimes the ‘loss’ will slowly and insidiously creep up on you; one decision, word, or event at a time. Each chips away at your interest, resolve, or beliefs.

In the secular world this phenomena is often referred to as ‘Burn-out’, and the terms ‘Crisis of Faith’ and ‘Loss of Faith’ are familiar to us in respect to our spiritual lives. The people affected were once talked about in hushed voices, the very idea that these things can happen, ignored until after the event. Now, fortunately, we are more open to recognizing the importance of balance and being cognizant of the situations that can precipitate issues for people. We provide chaplaincy and support programs that cover a whole gamut of situations, from the needs of disaster first responders and their spiritual supporters, to parish clergy.

For church leaders it’s important to remember the volunteers. My guess is that the Pareto Principle (often referred to as Pareto’s rule), probably understates it, but in essence it suggests that 80% of the volunteering will be done by 20% of the members of the church. It’s an unfortunate truth that it probably turns out that the 20% are the same people every time. We insist on annual training quotas, and make provision for sabbaticals for our clergy, but, what provisions do we make for our volunteers?

It’s an issue I’ve struggled with. There have been times at church when I was unable to fully immerse myself and participate in worship because I was counting the attendance for the Eucharist or patrolling the corridors for potential intruders. I have had to remind myself, that it wasn’t just work, but service. And when it became work, it was time to take a break.

Nowadays, I’m often not as rooted in the worship as I feel I should be. I’m sitting in the back of the church posting something about the service on social media, reviewing pictures to make sure I have what we need, or checking ahead in the order of service, so I can work out what I ought to be doing next. The plus side though, as I’ve mentioned before, is that I get to take part in a great number of life-changing events.

Evening Prayer at the Chapel Image: Gary Allman

Every year I try to attend the Episcopal Communicators Conference. It’s a great chance to swap stories, learn from each other, and every third year, the conference is held at a retreat center. I think this is a deliberate ploy to give us all a chance to recharge and regroup before the Communications onslaught that is General Convention. So in April, I enjoyed the peace and tranquility of sitting by a lake and spending a few hours hiking at the Kanuga Conference Center on the edge of the Blue Ridge Mountains. I was able to be ‘fully present’ at morning and evening prayer services. It was a great opportunity to recharge those spiritual batteries, and I heard a lot of things I needed to hear.

In this issue of Spirit, Carolyn Thompson writes again about her continuing ‘project’ to visit the churches of different faiths and how that has resulted in recharging and building her faith. There are lots of things that we can do. So, I’ll ask again. What is your church doing to look after today’s willing volunteers to ensure that they continue to be willing, rather than obliged? What can you do to help them by spreading the workload and broadening the pool of available resources?

General Convention

Love it or hate it, you can’t ignore it. The 79th General Convention of The Episcopal Church is nearly upon us. It’s very easy to think that it has nothing to do with what happens at my church on Sunday. In the long run, you’d be wrong. General Convention shapes and steers our direction and outlook, and not just for the next three years. It’s never too late to take an interest and see what resolutions are being debated and voted on. You still have the opportunity to make your thoughts known to the deputies who have been elected to represent you at General Convention.

During the run up to convention we’ll be building and updating the diocesan General Convention website, and we’ll be publishing regular news updates there and on social media. We’ve published a list of the deputies along with their contact information. If there are topics of specific interest that you’d like to be kept informed of, please let me know and I’ll make it my business to ensure they get coverage in our reports. The Diocesan Secretary, Curtis Hamilton, has written an introduction to this Convention, and we’ve also provided a link to a handy General Convention 101 Brochure produced by the Episcopal Diocese of Texas.

That Wedding

Despite our best efforts, up until ‘The Wedding’ (and as a Brit I exercise my right to refer to it as such), the light that is Presiding Bishop Michael Curry’s preaching, has remained mainly hidden under an Episcopal bushel. No longer, and Bishop Marty writes about it in much more eloquent terms than I in his Keeping Watch article.

However, I’m going to be difficult, and I am going to whine about it. Not the wedding you understand, but that the churches of West Missouri failed to prepare for dealing with a sudden surge of public interest. How so? For four years we’ve been regularly asking church leadership to ensure that their church’s information is included on the Episcopal Asset Map. I think I’d be overstating it if I said that half a dozen of the 48 churches have actually done so. In response to the media frenzy surrounding the PB’s sermon The Episcopal Church actively promoted its ‘Find a Church’ feature — which is (you’ve guessed it) The Episcopal Asset Map — Where was the information about the majority of West Missouri’s churches for anyone searching for an Episcopal Church in West Missouri? Unfortunately, sadly missing.

On the positive side, it’s not too late to do something about it and make sure your church doesn’t get passed over again. Anyone can suggest updates using the online form, you can find out how here.

Human Trafficking

You are going to be hearing a lot about Human Trafficking in the future, and that’s good. The more we can raise awareness, the more can be done to try and eradicate this deplorable crime. In this issue we’ve news about the proposed safe house from Lake of the Ozarks Stop Human Trafficking Coalition. A lot of human trafficking has its roots in the baser human condition, specifically the baser male human condition, and that’s going to be hard for some people to read and talk about — we’ll be addressing the role of pornography in human trafficking in the September Spirit. In this issue, Mike McDonnell, VP Human Trafficking Ministries with the Brotherhood of St. Andrew, writes about the relationship between Human Trafficking and Slavery, and be warned, he doesn’t pull any punches when it comes to calling out how men and their attitudes are a big part of the problem.

And Finally — The June Issue of Spirit

Well, it was supposed to be the May issue of Spirit, but life got in the way, and we encountered some, shall we say, ‘scheduling difficulties’ that can best be summed up as a ready and willing editor, and not a lot to edit. I was going to bluff it out and just publish the May issue in June, but, despite burning the midnight oil, the final version was ready just a little bit too far into June for even me to cheekily call it a May issue.

Gary Allman is Communications Director with The Diocese of West Missouri

A Message of Love

The Presiding Bishop has handed us a gift in his Royal Wedding address, now it is up to us to make the best use of it.

The Rt. Rev. Martin S. Field Five-minute read.   Resources

The Most Reverend Michael B. Curry Preaching at Trinity Cathedral, Portland Oregon.
Image: Gary Allman

Everywhere I go these days, people ask me, “Did you see Bishop Curry preach at the Royal Wedding?” Well, yes, I did. I assume by now that all Episcopalians have heard about, if not actually seen, our Presiding Bishop’s homily at the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markel.

In my opinion, Bishop Curry was magnificent. By that evening, people had gone wild trying to search the internet to find out about him. His name quickly became the single most searched name on the entire planet. He was even parodied that same evening on Saturday Night Live.

That he could raise so much interest from a 13-minute homily at a service where he wasn’t supposed to be anything but a bit player tells me that there is in this world, and among our planet’s people a huge hunger for an authentic and love-filled Gospel.  His message that God is love resonated powerfully with a world that has too much experience with hate and divisiveness, too much first-hand knowledge of oppression and bigotry, and too much familiarity with violence and horror.

Certainly, there have been detractors who pronounced his words as so much rubbish, or unfaithful to the Bible, but the overwhelming response says to me that we who follow Christ have a ripe harvest before us if only we can find the courage and the passion to enter the fields. This world, as Bishop Curry often reminds us, does not look the way God intended at creation.  But we have something – the love of God and the companionship of Beloved Community – to offer. If only we will! If only we will.

And that leads me to my hopes and prayers for this summer’s General Convention.  Several thousand folks will gather in Austin, Texas in early July for the triennial gathering of the highest authority in the life of our beloved Church. Hundreds of resolutions will be examined, and votes will be taken. But a smooth legislative process is not what I hope and pray for. I hope and pray for an experience of Beloved Community.  I hope to gather with several thousand kindred souls who love Jesus, are committed to Jesus’ Church and mission, and are faithful to walking together into the future that God guides us to build. 

Can all the problems of Church and society be solved because The Episcopal Church has a convention? Not even remotely. But we can reinvigorate one another. We can hear one another in respect and teach one another by sharing forthrightly and honestly. We can build cohesiveness, collaboration, and clarity of purpose among the many facets that make up our denomination.

The General Convention of The Episcopal Church can, and I hope will, be an example of Beloved Community to our church, to all churches, and to the world.  In Jesus’ High Priestly Prayer, he prays for the Church to be one, to live in unity. I frequently note that Jesus did not pray for uniformity; he did not ask us to be the same, like automatons. But he did pray that we would bring our diversity and our complementary differences as an offering toward building a wonderful and united whole: The Church of God.

For that I hope and pray.

The Rt. Rev. Martin Scott Field (Bishop Marty) is the eighth bishop of The Diocese of West Missouri.


General Convention is Coming!

How General Convention works, and some idea of what to expect from the 79th Convention of The Episcopal Church

Curtis Hamilton Ten-minute read.   Resources

Deputies and Bishops from 17 countries will soon meet in Austin, Texas for the 79th General Convention of The Episcopal Church. The General Convention is composed of over 800 deputies from the 109 dioceses and (potentially) 300 or more active and retired bishops of the Church. They will deliberate for nine legislative days from July 5-13, with some committees meeting as early as July 3.

How General Convention Works

Below is a brief summary of how General Convention makes its decisions.

  • The General Convention is a bicameral legislative body (that is to say that it is managed by two separate bodies). The House of Deputies and the House of Bishops meet separately.
  • Resolutions for discussion may be submitted from various groups throughout the Church (certain interim bodies, Bishops, Dioceses and Provinces, and Deputies).
  • Each resolution is assigned to a committee of the Convention. In committee hearings, testimony is heard, the resolution is debated and perfected, and a recommendation from the committee is forwarded to one of the houses (house of initial action).
  • In order for the resolution to become an Act of Convention, it must be approved by both houses in the exact same language before the General Convention adjourns.

Items to Come Before the Convention

The General Convention is the governing body of The Episcopal Church. As such, it takes action on numerous topics.

  • Legislation of concern to the Church — This is a broad category. It encompasses policy issues such as human trafficking, care of creation, and many more. It also includes issues in our church life such as gender equity, sexual misconduct in the church, and more.
  • Amending the Book of Common Prayer (BCP), the Constitution, and the Canons of the Church.

These above, along with Acts of Convention, describe both how the Church works and what it believes. Convention also deals with the following:

  • Adopting a triennial budget for The Episcopal Church — A budget for the Church for the next three years will be adopted. There are lots of clichés that could be used here (things about rubber and roads or treasure and heart come to mind), but this document does show what our missional priorities are for the next three years.
  • Electing candidates to offices, boards and other committees — These offices include President and Vice President of the House of Deputies, members of the Executive Committee of the Church, board of directors of the Church Pension Fund, and other groups.

In my opinion, the following are issues of high importance that will come before the General Convention. (These are in no particular order.)

  • Editing/Revising of the BCP — This includes the possibility of including liturgies for marriage for same-sex couples in the current BCP and the possible adoption of a plan for a revision of the entire BCP.
  • A proposal to provide a salary for the President of the House of Deputies.
  • Updates to the Canons regarding sexual misconduct by clergy and lay employees and leaders.

West Missouri Deputation Members

These are the members of the deputation:
Lay Delegates — Mr. Curtis Hamilton (Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral, Kansas City), Dr. Linda Robertson (St. John’s, Springfield), Ms. Amanda Perschall (Trinity, Lebanon), and Ms. Liz Trader (St. John’s, Springfield).

Clergy Delegates — Fr. Marshall Scott (St. Luke’s Health System, Deputation Chair), Mtr. Anne Meredith Kyle (Calvary, Sedalia), Fr. Tim Coppinger (EChO Regional Ministry), and Fr. Jonathan Frazier (St. Peter & All Saints, Kansas City).

Alternate Deputies attending — Mr. Channing Horner (St. Paul’s, Maryville), Ms. Christine Morrison (Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral, Kansas City), Fr. Stan Runnels (St. Paul’s, Kansas City), and Mtr. Megan Castellan (canonically resident in West Missouri).

Deputies and Alternates not attending — Ms. Carole Pryor (St. Philip’s, Joplin), Mr. Grafton Cook (St. Mary’s, Fayette), Fr. David Kendrick (St. John’s, Springfield), and Fr. Jose Palma (St. Nicholas’, Noel).

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to speak with any member of the deputation. You can email me (see below) and I will be glad to forward your question or comment (with your permission) to the rest of the deputation.

Ways to Follow General Convention

There are several ways you can follow General Convention here in West Missouri.

  • The General Convention website has a veritable treasure trove of information available. This includes the “Blue Book” reports from interim bodies that give background on some of the resolutions submitted. You can also find links to documents that explain how General Convention works.
  • You can find the resolutions submitted to the General Convention at vbinder.net. This site will also give you status updates of resolutions throughout the convention.
  • There will be choice of Livestreaming channels available including daily summaries and press conferences. Many will be in both English and Spanish. Check the various websites for details.

The members of the deputation look forward to serving you and the Church as a whole in this important work. We ask for your prayers as we prepare for and attend the General Convention in July.

Curtis Hamilton is a two-time deputy to the General Convention (2015, 2018). He has attended two other General Conventions (2003, 2012) as a visitor. He also serves as Secretary of the Diocese.

Resources

Back to Contents

General Convention 101



The Episcopal Diocese of Texas has produced a handy pictorial guide to General Convention. Click here or follow the link provided (below) to see an online version of the guide, which you can download and print if you wish.

Human Trafficking as It Relates to Slavery

Most Americans turn a blind eye towards slavery believing it only existed in the past. Unfortunately, that is not the case.

Mike McDonnell Ten-minute read.   Resources

We live in a world rife with cynicism, racism, hatred, bigotry, and the most despicable of all these sins is the enslavement of another person to accommodate man’s greed, lust and insatiable desire to control another’s life. In the First Letter to Timothy, we find Paul’s words:

18 Now we know that the law is good, if one uses it legitimately. 9 This means understanding that the law is laid down not for the innocent but for the lawless and disobedient, for the godless and sinful, for the unholy and profane, for those who kill their father or mother, for murderers, 10 fornicators, sodomites, slave traders, liars, perjurers, and whatever else is contrary to the sound teaching 11 that conforms to the glorious gospel of the blessed God, which he entrusted to me.
I Timothy 1:8-11

Mike McDonnell presents details of the breadth of the human trafficking problem. Image credit: Gary Allman
Most Americans turn a blind eye towards slavery believing it only existed in the past, possibly during the Civil War or maybe in biblical times, remembering Moses freeing the Hebrews from Egypt. I have read commentators who believed that slavery was a means used by the ancient world to care for widows, the poor and less fortunate; producing a welfare system through servitude. It was possible that some wealthy individuals took responsibility for those requiring help and these same people may have been emboldened by the fact that Jesus never spoke of physical slavery, but of the slavery that made us prisoners to sin. As you read Paul’s words above, you may wonder how people could believe that slavery was right in any way, shape or form. I am a pragmatic person, and I think Jesus was the ultimate pragmatist. He came to give eternal freedom and not to release those who were in temporary human bondage. However, because our Lord did not make any profound or lasting statements about slavery does not make it right.

Slavery has dominated the history of the United States and the history of The Episcopal Church for far too many years. In most cases, our nation and our church were complicit in the continuance of slavery. In today’s modern world we find women bonded into prostitution, children trafficked for sex and labor, and men forced to work for slave wages across the globe, and yes, even in our own backyard, here in the US.

I want to share a few important dates, with brief descriptions, so that you may understand and appreciate the bravery of those few who have brought us to where we are in our struggle against human trafficking:

  • The 1780s saw the first organized anti-slavery society established in Britain. 1.
  • In 1807, the slave trade was abolished by the British Parliament. 1.
  • In 1839, the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society was created, giving for the first time impetus to America’s abolitionist movement. 1.
  • In 1856, at the Episcopal General Convention, The Episcopal Church had “nothing to do with party politics, with sectional disputes, with earthly distinctions with the wealth, the splendor and the ambition of the world.” 2.
  • In 1865, the Protestant Episcopal Freedman’s Commission addressed the changes that had taken place in the south after the Civil War.2.
  • In 1877, the first Negro delegates were elected to the General Convention in West Texas and Florida. 2.
  • In 1883, the abolishment of slavery was itself abolished by the British Parliament. 1.
  • In the 1904 and 1907 General Conventions, a Suffragan Plan was established with restrictions. A suffragan could sit with the House of Bishops but could not vote. 2.
  • In 1921, the African Orthodox Church was formed by black Episcopal Priest, George Alexander, resulting from prejudices within The Episcopal Church. 2.
  • In 1948, the segregation of the armed forces and civil services ended. 2.
  • In 1948, Article 4 the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights stated that “No one shall be held in slavery or servitude; slavery and the slave trade shall be prohibited in all their forms.” 3.
  • In 1954, after the Supreme Court ruling in the Brown vs. Board of Education, the Episcopal Church began to dismantle its institutional segregation policies. 2.
  • In the 1958 General Convention, a resolution was adopted that officially condemned racial prejudice and segregation in the South. 2.
  • In 2000, the Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA 2000) was passed into law. It is considered to be the essential anti-trafficking law ever approved. 4.
  • On October 4, 2008, the Episcopal Church apologized for its role in slavery.
  • In March 2018, the Congress passed the Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act. This bill holds accountable websites, such as Backpage, when they knowingly facilitate sex traffickers. 5.

In many places in our world, people subscribe to the enslavement of others. In the United States, the home of the “free,” we are exposed daily to the notion that some people are not as valuable as others. This narrative is usually based on race, ethnicity, and sex with the desire to enrich oneself through the subjugation and control of others. The International Labour Organization estimated in 2016 that there were 40.3 million people in forced labor of which 2 million are in the Americas. In the United States, because of the secretive nature of labor trafficking, it is difficult to provide an accurate number of victims; however, it is estimated to be in the tens of thousands.

Sex trafficking is an appalling crime. In the United States, it is estimated that 300,000 youths annually are at risk to sex traffickers, with one in six being trafficked. The average age of a girl trafficked is 13 and will be asked to perform various sex acts up to 20 times daily. In a recent conversation with a trafficked victim, she contended that she was expected to produce $2,000 to $3,000 daily from being prostituted. If not, she was severely beaten or starved, or her life threatened. This woman subjugated her body to daily sexual abuse to generate income for her pimp’s financial gain, while she was degraded by the johns who paid for sex, and a society that sees her as nothing more than a prostitute who could leave her enslavement if she so chose.

We men have turned a blind eye towards our accountability in the treatment of women in our society, but even worse, we have enabled abusers, pimps, johns, and pornographers to capture our souls, our nation, and to damage forever the girls and women that have long suffered as sex objects. We do this through our conversations, glances, the purchase of sex and pornography, and by not teaching our male youth that women are to be respected. I suggest to men that they consider what it is like to be chained and tortured and forced to have sex against their will. What it would be like not to have a choice as to who you are with and to feel your body violated, not once, but multiple times daily, every single day of your existence. Imagine your mother, wife, daughter or sister suffering the constant repetition of this horror. The reasons why some girls are targeted by traffickers while others are not, varies. These trafficked girls and women may very well be the same women we purport to love and care for, but we do little to change their sexual environment. Therefore, where they live, their economic situation, race, or ethnicity does not protect them from sexual abuse and predators.

I believe there are very few women who have not suffered from unwanted sexual advances. Many women have been physically and sexually abused. Maybe you know someone, family or friend, who has experienced this kind of violence. It is likely that we are aware of females who have been abused or even suffering harm today. Just possibly, we may have been the abuser. The questions we men must resolve to find the answer to is why do we harm women, why do we seek sexual gratification illicitly, and why do we purchase and watch pornography?

Human trafficking in today’s world is called “Modern Day Slavery.” Slavery from the ancient times to the American Civil War to present day slavery has one thing in common, the exploitation of many for the financial gain of the few.

In the four-plus years that I have been involved in the “Stop Human Trafficking” movement, I find myself writing and rewriting the same words and asking myself, “How can I break through the generations of men with the learned behavior of discounting and abusing women?” I find myself becoming angry every time I look at the statistics about the number of women and children trafficked globally and in the US. I find that statistics do not stir the hearts of men, no matter how shocking they are, if we are not motivated to alter the way that we view and treat women. I understand that perfectly. I am as guilty as the next man in the way I regarded women. Years ago, my favorite response came from the question “When you see a woman what do you notice first?” I replied, “It depends on which way they are walking.” It sounded cute and funny then and to me was an innocent statement of fact. Unfortunately, it was a statement that went straight to the heart of sexual objectification of women. As I became involved in the anti-sex trafficking movement, I spent some time reflecting on my “go to” comment, and what I saw about myself was disconcerting. I realized how revealing my actions and views were in promoting the abuse of women to those around me, especially my children and friends. It was impossible for me to proclaim any degree of holiness when I believed that the degradation of women was acceptable.

Learned behavior is problematic to change, but not impossible. It takes desire, perseverance, support, and occasionally professional help to alter unhealthy behavior. Recently there was an article in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch religion page titled: “Look to Jesus to learn how to treat women.” Anita Anton quoted a comment from Barbara Leonhard, Oldenburg Franciscan,

“Jesus refused to treat women as inferior. Given the decidedly negative cultural view of women in Jesus’ time, the Gospel writers each testify to Jesus’ treating women with respect, frequently responding in ways that reject cultural norms. He recognizes their dignity, their desires, and their gifts.”

I appreciated her comments because if we treat women with “respect,” showing them the dignity they deserve and allowing them to use their God-given gifts fully, the sexual objectification of women will begin to cease. Finally, after all these thousands of years, women will be equal in the eyes of man. We can at least adhere to the path that the holiest man of all time, Jesus of Nazareth, has shown us to follow. So, let us begin.

This is a revised version of an article originally published in the Brotherhood of St. Andrew’s magazine: St. Andrew’s Cross.

Mike McDonnell is co-founder of the Lake of the Ozarks Stop Human Trafficking Coalition, VP Human Trafficking Ministries with the Brotherhood of St. Andrew, and a member of St. George Episcopal Church, Camdenton.

Resources

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References

Links

Saint Francis Community Services Reach Out to Youth in Kansas City

Working in partnership with the school district and with the nursing programs at Kansas City Kansas Community College and Metropolitan Community College, Saint Francis Community Services focus on prevention by identifying potential health problems before they grow more serious. That includes mental health issues.

Shane Schneider Five-minute read.   Resources

In April, at Schlagle High School, Debra McKenzie gathered a small group of students around her to discuss the health risks of cigarette and marijuana smoke on their lungs. One 18-year-old student moved in close to McKenzie and whispered that he had already quit smoking marijuana because he’s on probation. When she asked why he started using it in the first place, he said he had been depressed ever since his cousin was shot and killed. He just wanted the pain to go away.

 

“We run into that a lot,” says McKenzie. “Many of these kids start these behaviors to block out some of the stuff that has happened to them.”

Saint Francis mental health therapist Godswill Chuka, left, visits with a student during a recent Youth Health Day at Schlagle High School.
Supplied image
That’s why she likes to use outreach events to connect with kids who need help learning to cope with depression, overcome addiction, or deal with behavioral issues. A community outreach project of Saint Francis Community Services, Youth Health Day provides health and dental screenings to students at all 13 middle and high schools in Kansas City, Kansas. Working in partnership with the school district and with the nursing programs at Kansas City Kansas Community College and Metropolitan Community College, McKenzie and her staff focus on prevention by identifying potential health problems before they grow more serious. That includes mental health issues.

McKenzie, Saint Francis clinical director for community-based services, sensed why the student had confided in her. He needed help.

“I told him that in our ADAPT and mental health programs, we work with students just like him to find new ways to deal with depression and pain,” she said. “I told him I was sure we could help him and asked if he’d like to give us a try. Without hesitation, he said, ‘Yes,’ and gave me his phone number.”

They’re just two of the programs Saint Francis provides in Kansas City, but ADAPT and mental health treatment are essential pieces of the Episcopal nonprofit’s array of child and family services. ADAPT (Adolescent/Adult Drug and Alcohol Prevention and Treatment) provides multi-level outpatient alcohol and drug treatment within a therapeutic setting for persons struggling with substance abuse. Most of Saint Francis’ adolescent clients have been court-ordered to receive treatment, which means they often lack motivation to participate. So, to ensure they show up to get the help they need, Saint Francis even provides transportation to counseling sessions.

“As part of our mental health services, we also offer psychological assessments” said McKenzie. “Through our collaboration with the University of Kansas School of Medicine, we can provide psychiatric and medication evaluations. Our program fills a gap because Wyandotte County has a shortage of psychiatrists who serve indigent and low-income populations. Often the only other place where clients on Medicaid can receive services is through the Community Mental Health Center, which has long waiting lists. We can shorten the wait period for clients who need help.”

Saint Francis currently provides substance and mental health treatment for about 75 persons, most of whom are between the ages of 12 and 19. But clients don’t have to be youngsters to receive help. Nor, must they be low-income or referred by the courts. Anyone with an assessment indicating they need treatment can self-refer and get help.

Yet, most of Saint Francis’ work in Kansas City centers on struggling and at-risk young people. The ministry also offers the HEART (Healthy Empowering Adolescent Relationship Training) program, which helps young people develop self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship and decision-making skills. And, as in the rest of Kansas, Saint Francis provides foster care in Kansas City, which includes an anger management program for teens dealing with trauma.

Service to children and families is built into the DNA of Saint Francis Community Services, and its story of ministry is something The Very Rev. Chas Marks enjoys sharing with both his diocese and the rest of the Church. He’s a busy man. Priest In Charge of St. Augustine’s Episcopal Church and Dean of the Northwest-Metro Deanery, Marks also serves as Saint Francis’ Senior Advisor for Community and Church Relations.

“Saint Francis is providing life-affirming services to an underserved population in the Kansas City Metro,” said Marks. “I get to share the story of the good work Saint Francis is doing in Kansas City and in other parts of the world with our local community and churches. There are so many opportunities for individuals and parishes to partner with Saint Francis to provide healing to children and families in Kansas City and beyond.”

When Marks isn’t pastoring, he’s talking about Saint Francis in pulpits and at coffee klatches throughout The Diocese of West Missouri. He hopes to meet friends and partners willing to join Saint Francis in its ministry of service to those most in need — the overlooked, the marginalized, the powerless. It’s a mission Saint Francis shares with the Church, and it’s a mission of hope.

Dozens of young people and adults regularly pass through the office doors of Saint Francis to receive therapeutic treatment for substance use or other behavioral issues. Some days, the clients include parents attending a support group because McKenzie and her colleagues always try to include the family in a client’s treatment. That’s because Saint Francis believes strong families produce healthy and happy children.

“Our hope,” said McKenzie, “is always to help those who need it most, especially those who lack the resources, the knowledge, the skills, or the support to help themselves. That’s why we’re here.”

To learn more about Saint Francis Community Services, contact Fr. Chas Marks about a visit to your church.

Shane Schneider is the Senior Copywriter for The Saint Francis Foundation and Saint Francis Community Services. He is the major contributor for Saint Francis’ quarterly magazine Hi-Lites.


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Youth Ministry

A look back at my first year as diocesan Youth Ministry Coordinator plus an introduction to this summer’s interns.

Josh Trader Five-minute read.   Resources

The end of June marks my one-year anniversary as the Youth Ministry Coordinator for the diocese. As I look back and reflect on my first year, several things stand out.

Youth Network Coordinator Josh Trader addresses the Diocesan Convention Image credit: Gary Zumwalt
I have given my first State of Youth Ministry address on the convention floor, worked with our incredible team of adult leaders to put on several amazing youth events, journeyed to Charleston for the FORMA conference, bid farewell to the North Central Metro Network Coordinator for youth, Mother Megan, as she started her journey as rector of St. John’s in Ithaca, New York, and began working with our Interim Network Coordinator, Alexandra Connors. I also want to thank all the adult leadership, the Youth Ministry Commission, the youth of our diocese and their parents for all of their support as we have journeyed through this change. As fantastic as the first year was, I am looking forward to the many years and new adventures to come.  

A few months ago, myself, Kim Snodgrass (The Bishop’s Assistant for Christian Formation) and Bishop Marty began looking at what my official job title meant and how it could be perceived. After a lot of discussion we came to the conclusion that a change was in order. The result is that my title is now The Bishop’s Assistant for Youth Ministry Development. What does that mean? Our hope is that it gives a better indication of my role in developing youth ministry. I am here to help and work with all churches in our diocese as they develop their youth ministry programs. When a church is beginning the conversation of how to start, build on, or thinking about youth ministry I am here to be a resource for them.

I am working with Kim to finish our Ministry Handbook, a dream that started two years ago, at a diocesan youth leaders’ retreat. The dream was to have a resource that helps churches and individuals through the many processes involved in establishing ministries. Some of these processes are; how to begin developing a philosophy of ministry, strategic planning, youth ministry, integrational ministry, risk management, and the various tools and resources available. We hope to have the final copy available by the end of 2018. 
 
In May we began looking for two part-time Regional Youth Ministry Coordinators to coordinate network events and to help build relationships on a regional level. With the new positions every church in our diocese will have a Regional Youth Minister to bring the youth across our diocese together when we are not at a diocesan event. We plan to make the announcement of the new coordinators in July.  

I am also pleased to announce that we have hired Katie Mansfield, Hayley Cobb and Taylor Mansfield for our summer intern program. They will work in the WEMO Youth Community for nine weeks, learning from all the people in youth leadership and beyond. They will learn how to plan and facilitate events, formation planning, assist in strategic marketing and grow in their relationship with Christ.  

Find out more about our new interns below.

Josh Trader is The Bishop’s Assistant for Youth Ministry Development for The Diocese of West Missouri and a member of St. James’ Episcopal Church, Springfield.

Hayley Cobb

Hayley Cobb
Hello! My name is Hayley Cobb and I’m from Ozark, Missouri. I am currently in my first year of college at Drury University and attend Christ Episcopal Church in Springfield, Missouri. At Drury, I am majoring in Strategic Communication. I am the Vice President of Episcopal Campus Ministry in Springfield which I have been regularly attending through my freshman year of college. Growing up I was very involved with the diocesan youth program therefore it holds a special place in my heart. During my time as a youth, I was a member of the Youth Ministry Commission and a youth delegate for the Southern Deanery. I have been eager to have the opportunity to be an intern and give back to the program that gave me so much. During this summer internship program, I am excited to get to spend more time working alongside the other adults and youth. I love getting to see the youth grow in their faith and foster relationships with one another. I am also looking forward to getting to spend time working on my own faith with the other interns, and developing lots of important skills.

Katie Mansfield

Katie Mansfield
Hello, my name is Katie Mansfield. I am currently 19 years old and I am studying at the University of Missouri – Kansas City. I am studying Accounting and thinking of adding a minor in Human Resources. I am originally from Carthage, Missouri where I attended Grace Episcopal Church for the past eight or so years. Even though I may never attend Grace Church on a regular basis ever again, I will always consider it to be my home church. Moving to Kansas City has been such an exciting new adventure and is unlike anything I’ve done before. I have been presented with incredible opportunities. In August of 2017 for example, I was asked to be the youth intern at Grace and Holy Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, and earlier this month I was accepted into a position to be an intern for WEMO Youth. I am so excited to be able to continue working with the youth I’ve grown so close to this past year, and also continue my relationships with the youth and adults whom I’ve known since my early years as a youth. I am most looking forward to getting to really make an impact on people’s lives through my work as an intern this summer. Ever since I’ve been a youth, the summer interns have been people I’ve looked up to and aspired to be like. Because of them, I’ve been looking forward to this opportunity for so long and now that it’s here, I can only hope to have the same impact. 

Taylor Mansfield

Taylor Mansfield
Hi everyone! My name is Taylor Mansfield and I am so excited to have been chosen to be an intern this summer! I am 19 years old and am from Carthage, Missouri and attended Grace Episcopal Church. I am currently a sophomore at Missouri State University and plan to major in elementary education with a minor in Spanish. Since being in Springfield, I have been going to St. James Episcopal Church on Sunday mornings and on Tuesday nights I go to Episcopal Campus Ministry at Christ Church. I absolutely love working with kids of all different ages, so I am really looking forward to having the opportunity to help the youth along on their faith journey and to be here as someone who can help with whatever they may need. I am hoping that coming out of this internship I will have deepened my relationship with God and have found a greater meaning of what my faith means to me. I believe that being surrounded by, and having the opportunity to work with, like-minded people will be something that will really help guide me in figuring out who I am as a Christian individual. I can’t wait to see what is in store for this summer!  

How Can You Not Be Changed?

Part Two on Deepening Your Relationship with God by Worshiping with Other Faiths

Carolyn Thompson Ten-minute read.   Resources

Stained glass windows at Calvary Episcopal Church. Image: Gary Allman

I spent Maundy Thursday at a Methodist Church singing the choral Living Last Supper, and Good Friday at an ELCA Lutheran Church, and sitting in the dark of the Easter Vigil service in the beautiful, Calvary Episcopal Church. And I thought, “walking with Jesus through Holy Week, how can you not be changed?” and it struck me that the Easter Vigil, is very like the changes happening to me from going to different places of worship each week. I had been through 40 days (okay, possibly, 59 years) of what amounts to Lent — a season of reflection, of preparation, of sacrifice, and of being in the desert. At the Easter Vigil I start in darkness, but slowly with the first light of Easter and the hearing of our salvation history and the renewal of my baptismal vows (and this was the first time it ever meant anything to me – I was surprised), I realize just how far I’ve come in my spiritual journey these past 20 months. A journey in which I expected to change but never dreamed I would be changed so much!

In case you didn’t read Part One of the story my journey began 20 months ago with a calling to go to a different place of worship each week within a one-and-a-half hour drive of home, so that I could learn to feel and see God no matter where I was.

One of the interesting things about dropping myself into a new place of worship each week is that I get to see a glimpse of the life of each church/organization I visit. I was there:

  • The Sunday after the 2nd organist in a row quit;
  • after the rector broke his arm the night before and after the scramble to prepare Morning Prayer a retired priest volunteered from the congregation to do the Eucharist;
  • after a heavy snow and after the Lake flooded and other events that bring a community together;
  • after the pastor went home for his ailing mother and didn’t return in time for the service, so the Elders led a prayer service;
  • for the first Easter Vigil that a church’s congregation had experienced;
  • when they welcomed back to church a man everyone thought would die the week before;
  • for an Easter sunrise service (my first ever) when it was 5 degrees and windy as the sun came up.

What are the odds I’d see so many of these unplanned, and truly formational events in the lives of these churches? Of course the answer is that God’s actions aren’t odds, for me they’re just part of the continuing strengthening of my relationship with Him, with other people, and with myself.

Picking My Weekly Place of Worship

I’ve had some really unique experiences after choosing my place of worship for the week.

Here are a couple of examples of what happens when I go where I let God lead me:

  1. I went to my church because I was scheduled to acolyte but something was wrong with the schedule so they didn’t need me. I got on the internet to see what church that I hadn’t been to in the area that had a service in the next half hour. The experience provided one of my most memorable “aha” moments regarding the progress I’d made in my journey.
  2. I was reading a book that led me to think I wanted to try meditating. In the middle of the book I ended up at a Unity church (lots of meditating) and had a great experience. I had planned to go to Unity Church the month before, but my plans had to change. Had I gone when I’d planned, before reading the book, the service would have made me feel uncomfortable. Visiting after reading the book, I was able to get a lot from the service.

Here’s what often happened when I was picking a place of worship to go to:

I would call and leave a message asking for the service time, and I didn’t get a call back. Nothing, nada.

These were all places I had chosen to go to (trying to get to a few faith traditions on my list). I tried calling them multiple times over a few months and never received a call back. I found this to be so odd, who wouldn’t want someone to join them in worship? It actually made me want to go all the more. The national website of another faith tradition that didn’t call me back said they “welcome everyone”. Interesting.

Realizations

  • Everything affects everything – since I started this journey I frequently notice how what’s happening to me right now is connected to multiple other things that have happened.
  • While praying for people in a nationally publicized tragedy, I realized how powerful it was that all over the world people were going to different kinds of worship and they we were all praying for those impacted by the tragedy.
  • Some places have specific memories and lessons that I learned about myself as I worshiped.
  • There was the great teaching pastor who literally made Bible stories “come to life” for me.
  • At a church in Florida, all of sudden, I really understood what “Christ died for my sins” means. Something I’ve been struggling to understand for decades
  • I’ve been introduced to many versions of the formal prayer of confession, the prayer of thanksgiving, the prayer before communion, and before the offertory. I love the Book of Common Prayer, but I have seen some even more meaningful versions – and that’s saying a lot coming from me!
  • The different traditions have an amazing number of names for the same thing, be it different parts of a worship service, parts of a church building, or it’s furniture and even the pronunciation of the word “amen”

Places of Worship Attended Since My First Article

Church/Denomination Number of Visits
Church of Christ 1
Church of the Nazarene 1
Assembly of God 1
MS Lutheran 2
Unity 2
Greek Orthodox 1
Roman Catholic 1
Disciples of Christ 5 (same church, love their outdoor service)
ELCA Lutheran 1
Methodist 5 (4 are the same church, I was asked back to sing)
Non-denominational 3
Presbyterian 1
Baptist 1
My church 8 (to acolyte)
Other Episcopal churches 2

I started out on a one-year journey of visiting other traditions. At the end of that year I couldn’t give it up. At the time I didn’t know if this was me or God directing me. Now at the end of my 20th month I can definitely see God’s hand in my journey. If we ever meet, you can ask me about a huge life event in the 19th month that made it oh so clear.

Sadly my list of “be sure I get to these places of worship” hasn’t been completed in the last 10 months. Why? Other opportunities have been taken as I let God lead me, my church has a rector again, so I’m acolyting once a month, and another church has me leading singing once a month.

So here’s what’s left:

  • 7th Day Adventist (it doesn’t count that we parked our motorhome in the Plantation Key, Florida 7th Day Adventist church’s lot this Winter –- and what a lovely pastor we talked to)
  • Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (I have tried calling the one nearest me multiple times with no call back – I will branch out)
  • Jehovah’s Witness (same as above)
  • Buddhist Temple
  • Muslim Mosque
  • Mennonite
  • Christian Science. I am reading “My Twelve Years with Mary Baker Eddy” and I have a copy of “Science and Health” to read, but I still want the “worship” experience.

I Expected to Change, But Not This Much

In my journey I was hoping to learn to see/feel God in every worship experience. Instead I am getting so much more.

  • I am getting the ultimate of “aha” moments from the outcome of a Christ-like relationship with others and with myself.
  • I am not judging things that before I started this journey, I would have hated (my mother always told me that “hate” was too strong a word, no one really actually hates, but these come pretty close for me). Just three cases in point (arguably the two things in worship I have been most verbal about disliking and had felt actual hurt the ability to connect with God).
  • Just after the beginning of the service at an Assembly of God – people who asked for prayer came to the front and a large number of people huddled around them and prayed loudly, all at the same time, all with different words so it was a cacophony of sound while the rest of us sang a long hymn – my reaction was one of feeling I’d been part of all those prayers and I was stunned at myself as previously I’d have felt it was a distraction at best and showy at worst.
  • Another Sunday, and Mother’s Day Sunday at that, the Church of Christ service was completely centered on the scripture of wives submitting to their husbands and no women talked, held positions of leadership in the church, and appeared to be perfectly in agreement with this through the 45 minute message on how important this was to Christian world – my reaction was again stunned that I wasn’t livid. I was simply interested in how all the pieces fit together to make the best Christian homes, communities and world.
  • And finally, a large portion of the almost 3 hours of chanting in the Greek Orthodox church was so fast I couldn’t even read fast enough to see what words the Reader was saying much less be able to read it myself and certainly not learn anything – my reaction was at first frustrated (but not the “what is wrong with people who read this fast?” of yesteryear) and then slowly I was able to start keeping up (3 hours will do that to you!) and in fact I later thought that this method was helpful to me as a feeling of immersion in the scriptures (not exaggerating, I timed it – he read 10 whole Psalms in about 5 minutes).

If I can come this far in 20 months, I can’t imagine what the next 20 months will hold.

But then again, maybe I am not meant to imagine. Me the planner, me the objectives girl. Maybe that is my true lesson so far — I am now allowing worship to happen to me. And because of this I will no longer subscribe to the popular saying “God never gives you more than you can handle”. Instead I am now saying “God always gives you more than you ever imagined”.

Carolyn B Thompson is a cradle Episcopalian with an unquenchable thirst for more relationship with her beloved Father.

Interview With Dean Peter DeVeau

An interview with Dean Peter DeVeau, who recently concluded his ministry at Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral, Kansas City.

Melissa Scheffler Five-minute read.   Resources

The Very Rev. Peter DeVeau.
Supplied image
What’s your favorite memory of your time at the Cathedral?

I have to say that I absolutely love December at the Cathedral. All the people that course through our spaces in the month of December.

Also, I think some of my best memories are of Thanksgiving Eve, when we come together without all the pressure of High Holy Days. We have a service that has a real connection to the rest of the world, in that we take the harvest altar apart because it’s going to be used for food. That seems to embody what I see as the essence of the Cathedral.

Another thing was when we had the service for Nelson Mandela here, after he died. And how the South African community has made a home at the Cathedral. They have their Freedom Day celebration here every year. That, to me, has been an important part of who we are as a Cathedral.

What will you miss the most about being at the Cathedral?

The people. I’ll miss the people and the connections, the connections to Greater Kansas City through the Cathedral. The feeling that I’m in the heart of the city. And I’ll miss staff colleagues. I guess you could boil it all down to relationships.

If you could have people remember one thing about you, what would it be?

That I had a good impact on the Cathedral. And if I’m going to be remembered for something at the Cathedral, I’d like it to be for getting The Way going, the catechumenate. That’s a really transforming time for the people who participate in it. What’s very interesting about the people who have been part of The Way, most of them stick around and are here consistently and they’re strong supporters, both in terms of their time and their resources.

Peter DeVeau.
Supplied image
What do you plan to do in the future?

Hmm, well, those doors are opening, but I’m not sure at this point. I do know that I will do some writing. I already have started outlining a book.

What words of wisdom would you offer to the next Dean?

I think that you need to understand two things here at the Cathedral. The Cathedral is the cathedral for The Diocese of West Missouri and it’s a house of prayer for all people, but it’s also a vibrant parish church and it’s important to keep that in balance.

And I would want to say to the next Dean that it’s not like a parish church in the sense that there are a lot more demands on your time here. So it’s important to gather a staff that is capable of taking care of the day to day tasks that are necessary to keep the church running smoothly.

I would also want to say to the next Dean another important thing, too, is to build many different ways in which people can be connected in small groups. So that they have one-on-one relationships with people in the congregation, so that there’s better connections between everyone.

Dean Peter DeVeau formally retires in July 2018. This interview was originally published in the Spring 2018 issue of Angelus.

Melissa Scheffler is Communications Coordinator at Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral.

An Extended Stay Safe House For Human Trafficking Victims

We are ready to begin the next step in our plan: which is to open an extended-stay safe-house.

Dr. Sally Kemp Two-minute read.   Resources

Dr. Sally Kemp, President, LOSHTC.
Supplied image

For the past three years, Lake of the Ozarks Stop Human Trafficking Coalition’s (LOSHTC) goals have been to raise awareness about human trafficking in the Lake of the Ozarks area. We have held monthly meetings for the public to discuss various aspects of human trafficking: how it occurs, how to recognize it, and many other pertinent topics, including victims sharing their stories of being trafficked for many years. We have presented talks across the lake area whenever requested, we have shown movies with discussions following to teach young people how to protect themselves and their friends. We devoted a meeting to the dangers of surfing the web, especially for children and teenagers.

With the help of a grant from The Sharing and Caring Foundation and a donation from Wise Women Who Give to Women, we were able to present a full day’s training to 38 members of law enforcement from across the area. This helped them understand the neuropsychological impact of abuse on the development of the young brain, how this leaves a child vulnerable to human trafficking, the effects of it on those trafficked, how to recognize and approach an individual who appears to be trafficked, and the usual outcomes for these individuals. Because the event passed the Federal criteria for training, certifications with CE credits were awarded to the participating officers.

Along with our on-going awareness training, we are beginning to partner with the SART (Sexual Assault Response Team) program at Lake Regional Hospital to compile figures each month on how many women and girls have been treated in the hospital for injuries consistent with sexual violence and trafficking.

While we will continue to raise awareness, the coalition now feels that we are ready to begin the next step in our plan: which is to open an extended-stay safe-house. Such a place can provide the extra time and treatment needed by women who are having difficulty re-entering normal life. This is usually due to marked PTSD and a complete lack of belief in their own worth, because their survival depended on obeying their trafficker.

In such a haven, over one year and sometimes two, women will receive Trauma-informed Care. This allows a victim to receive intensive and validating treatment that addresses their PTSD trauma and helps her reclaim her life. We are beginning to look at possible sites and are gearing up for intensive training for those who will be working with the victims.

Dr. Sally Kemp is Co-founder and President of the Lake of the Ozarks Stop Human Trafficking Coalition and a member at St. George Episcopal Church Camdenton. She is also a licensed Lay Eucharistic Minister, Eucharistic Visitor, and Worship Leader.

Area Confirmations at Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral

Donna Field Two-minute read.   Resources
On Saturday April 7, 2018, Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral, Kansas City, hosted diocesan Area Confirmations.

Image: Donna Field

On Saturday April 7, 2018, Grace sand Holy Trinity Cathedral, Kansas City hosted diocesan Area Confirmations. Taking part were members of St. Andrew’s, Kansas City; Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral, Kansas City; St. Mary’s Kansas City, St. Peter & All Saints, Kansas City; and Church of the Resurrection, Blue Springs.


 

Those Being Confirmed

  • St. Andrew’s, Kansas City: Malcolm Bagwell Trigg, Harrison Arthur Gloe, Genevieve Pryatt Hyatt, Alexander James Buck, Emma Elisabeth Angilan, Kristen Leigh Jordan-Hyde, Andrew S. Kim, Phillip H. Park,
    Madalyn Vause.
  • Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral, Kansas City: Nick Smith.
  • St. Mary’s, Kansas City: Raja Reed, John Stanks, Erica Janel, Hayden Heverling, David Higdon, Alisyn Arness.
  • St. Peter & All Saints, Kansas City: Morris F. Dearing (Moe), Jo N. Dearing.
  • Church of the Resurrection, Blue Springs: Alexandra Witte, Nicholas Witte.

Those Being Received

  • St. Mary’s, Kansas City: Christopher McQueeny.
  • Church of the Resurrection, Blue Springs: Arla Witte, Bob Simpson.

Those Being Reaffirmed

  • Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral, Kansas City: Jeri Hatteberg.

Please note that you can click/tap on any of the above pictures to see a bigger picture. You can also download print quality images from the diocesan Flickr page.

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Area Confirmations at Grace Episcopal Church, Carthage

Gary Allman Two-minute read.   Resources
On Saturday April 21, 2018, Grace Episcopal Church, Carthage, hosted diocesan Area Confirmations.
Image: Gary Allman

On Saturday April 21, 2018, Grace Episcopal Church, Carthage hosted diocesan Area Confirmations. Taking part were members of Christ Church, Springfield; Grace, Carthage; St. Nicholas, Noel; St. Philips Joplin and All Saints, Nevada.


 

Those Being Confirmed

  • Christ Episcopal Church, Springfield: Emily Cobb, Isabelle Dunn, Esperanze Garza, Jacob Heuett. Lauren Hoaglin.
  • Grace, Carthage: Kassandra Gonzalez, Pamela Williams, Michael Sisson, Elaine Wurst, Dana Frazier, Cynthia Martin, Max Hill, Cheryl Hill.
  • St. Nicholas, Noel: The names of those presented are not currently available.
  • St. Philip’s, Joplin: Ryland Dermott, Adam Turney, Nicholas Turney, Stacy Turney.
  • All Saints, Nevada: LeAnnis Fox, Justin Pryor, Ashley Melech, Mary Norman, Jessica Stone, Cheryl Martin, Roy Norman, Mark George.

Those Being Received

  • Grace Carthage: Maria Cruz Gonzalez, Polo Portillo.

Please note that you can click/tap on any of the above pictures to see a bigger picture. You can also download print quality images from the diocesan Flickr page.

Gary Allman is Communications Director with The Diocese of West Missouri

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  • Flickr Album:

Area Confirmations at Calvary Episcopal Church, Sedalia

Gary Allman Two-minute read.   Resources
Area Confirmations a Calvary Episcopal Church Sedalia.
Image: Gary Allman

On Saturday May, 5 2018, Calvary Episcopal Church, Sedalia hosted diocesan Area Confirmations. Taking part were members of Calvary, Sedalia; Christ Church, Warrensburg; and St. Peter’s, Harrisonville.


 

Those Being Confirmed

  • Calvary, Sedalia: Bridget Young, Elizabeth Wickham, Jennifer Harker, Sharon Dawley.
  • Christ Church, Warrensburg: Bailey Tucker, Aaron Bax.
  • St. Peter’s, Harrisonville: Ryan Brotton.

Those Being Received

  • St. Peter’s, Harrisonville: Katie Britton.

Please note that you can click/tap on any of the above pictures to see a bigger picture. You can also download print quality images from the diocesan Flickr page.

Gary Allman is Communications Director with The Diocese of West Missouri

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Roanridge Trust Award Grants Announced For Innovative Leadership Development Programs

The Roanridge Trust was established by the Cochel family, who originally gave a working farm in Missouri called Roanridge to The Episcopal Church.

The Episcopal Church Ten-minute read.   Resources

The Roanridge Trust was established by the Cochel family, who originally gave a working farm in Missouri called Roanridge to The Episcopal Church. Income from the trust generates the grant funds. The purpose of the Roanridge Trust is for specific use for the training of town and country clergy and rural Christian workers of the nine provinces of The Episcopal Church.

The Roanridge Trust Award Grants are provided annually for creative models of leadership development, training and ministries in small towns and rural communities across The Episcopal Church.

At the beginning of May the Roanridge Trust Award Grants were announced. The grants were awarded to twelve projects in ten dioceses and two provinces, totaling $211,210.

Recipients

The twelve projects receiving 2018 Roanridge Trust Grants are:

  • Diocese of Oklahoma, ELCA Joint Oklahoma Small Church Leadership Summit: $5,000
  • Diocese of Long Island, Rural & Migrant Ministry’s CASA: $20,000
  • Diocese of North Carolina, Lee County Literacy Council/Augustine Literacy Project: $10,000
  • Diocese of Southwestern Virginia, Dismantling Racism in Southwestern Virginia: $9,210
  • Diocese of Virginia, Lay Pastoral Leader Training Program: $8,000
  • Province IX, The Episcopal Asset Map for Spanish-Speaking, Non-US Dioceses: $12,400
  • Diocese of Western North Carolina: Stewardship of the Entirety of Our Lives in a Rural Setting: $10,000
  • Province 1 ( Dioceses of CT, MA, ME, NH, RI, VT, West MA), Models of Ministry in Small Vital Congregations: $7,000
  • Diocese of Northern Indiana, Becoming Beloved Community: $74,600
  • Diocese of Western Michigan, Center for Christian Spirituality: $15,000
  • The Episcopal Church in South Carolina, SmashGlass: $15,000
  • Navajoland, Online Gratitude Formation Program – UTO University: $25,000

Dioceses, congregations, and Episcopal-related organizations and institutions were invited to apply for the grants. Although previous recipients were eligible to apply, priority was given to new applications.

Questions about the Roanridge Trust can be addressed to Ann Hercules, Associate for Ministry Beyond The Episcopal Church and Grants.

The Public Affairs Office of The Episcopal Church