Bishop’s Day at St. James Episcopal Church, Springfield

St. James Springfield, hosted the southern Bishop’s Day event on March 23 this year.

Gary Allman Two-minute read.   Resources
Finance discussion. Diocesan Treasurer, Tom Kokjer (left) with Ron Weil, Finance Administrator. Image credit: Gary Allman
Warden’s Network. Image credit: Gary Allman
Safe Church discussion. Image credit: Gary Allman
Bishop Marty’s opening talk. Image credit: Gary Allman
Canon Steve starts the day. Image credit: Gary Allman
Constitution and Canons discussion led by David Powell, Diocesan Chancellor (left) . Image credit: Gary Allman
Vocational Discernment. Image credit: Gary Allman

Gary Allman is Communications Director with The Diocese of West Missouri

The Ordinations of Joseph Pierjok and James Yazell to the Diaconate

Photographs: Donna Field and Chris Morrison five-minute read.   Resources
The ordinations into the Diaconate of James Yazell and Joseph Pierjok at Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral on March 24, 2019. Image credit: Chris Morrison

On the afternoon of Sunday March 24, 2018, Joseph Pierjok and James Yazell were ordained into the Diaconate at Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral, Kansas City, Missouri.

The ordinations of into the Diaconate of James Yazell and Joseph Pierjok at Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral on March 24, 2019. Image credit: Chris Morrison

The Rev. Joe Pierjok

The ordinations into the Transitional Diaconate of James Yazell and Joseph Pierjok at Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral on March 24, 2019. Image credit: Donna Field

I was born and raised in Kansas City, Missouri. My family would tell you that I have always had a calling to the priesthood since a very young age. Perhaps it was because all my sister wanted was for me to be a puppy or a baby Jesus while my mother was pregnant with me, or how I used to play priest in my bedroom forcing my sister and pets to attend daily mass. I was raised in the Roman Catholic Church and was very active until after my confirmation when I felt that the Roman Church was no longer my home. It was my senior year of High School when my best friend invited me to Sunday school at Good Shepard to meet a girl, that I was first introduced to the Episcopal Church. I quickly felt the Holy Ghost calling me home, and I’ve been an Episcopalian ever since.

I attended Rockhurst University in downtown Kansas City where I obtained my bachelors in Education, History, and Theology. Following my college years, I ran two restaurants in Parkville, Missouri and was hired as the Youth Pastor at Redeemer Episcopal Church. It was during my years as a Youth Pastor that the youth of this diocese and the wonderful adult volunteers solidified my calling to serve as a priest. The thanks and love that I have for the youth program of this diocese is boundless. I also owe a huge amount of gratitude to Fr. Joe Behen and the wonderful people of Redeemer Episcopal Church who discerned deeply with me, loved and prayed with me every step of the way on this journey that God has called me on. I love you all so very deeply!

I attended, what I believe to be, the greatest seminary in our Episcopal Church, Seminary of the Southwest in Austin, Texas. This was my first experience of living outside of Kansas City, and I never thought I would live in Texas, but I am so glad that God called me there. I completed my Master’s of Divinity in May of 2019 and have been called to serve at Grace Episcopal Church in Carthage, Missouri. I started my work there on June 1st. The people of Grace Church have been nothing short of incredible. I am humbled and grateful to have been called to such a wonderful place! I look forward to growing, learning, and serving alongside them for many years to come! Fr. Steve Wilson is a beloved rector and I thank God everyday for Fr. Steve’s ministry and mentorship that he provides to not only me, but to an entire city!

God willing and the people consenting my ordination to the priesthood is scheduled for October 12th, 2019 at 2p.m. at Grace Episcopal Church in Carthage, Missouri.

It’s good to be back in the greatest diocese in the Episcopal Church and I look forward to what God has in store for all of us!

The Rev. James Yazell

About to deliver the dismissal — The Rev. James Yazell (left) and The Rev. Joseph Pierjok. Image credit: Donna Field

Ever since discovering the Episcopal Church in High School there was something about the priest’s work at the altar that I found immensely compelling. As someone who was not raised in a sacramental tradition, I was really drawn to that close proximity to the sacraments. Yet, even with that vision it was difficult for me to settle on pursuing that call. Throughout college I found myself constantly grasping at other vocations and careers, everything from Geology to Urban Planning. While there was something within all those fields I found interesting and fulfilling I always found this itch in the back of my mind drawing me back to the priesthood. Finally, I realized that God was not going to stop nudging me in that direction and so I declared a Philosophy major at the University of Missouri, Kansas City and began the official discernment process after graduating.

The first seminary my wife, Kelsey, and I visited was the School of Theology at the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee and we knew right away that God was calling us there. The residential seminary model was made all the more powerful on the top of that “holy mountain,” the Cumberland Plateau. From that mountain top we were able to dedicate the next three years of our life to living in a close knit community guided by the monastic model of daily prayer, study, and work.

That experience was incredibly formative and was truly confirming in my sense of call to the vocation of the priesthood. As I look forward to beginning my ministry as the Cleric-in-Charge at St. James Episcopal Church in Shreveport, Louisiana I am grateful that God has entrusted me with the cure of souls and that I had the opportunity to prepare for that privilege and responsibility on the holy mountain.

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Stop Human Trafficking and Abuse Event

On Saturday March 30 a Stop Human trafficking and Abuse event was held at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City.

Gary Allman Two-minute read.   Resources

On a snowy Saturday morning in March a group of determined individuals attended the ‘Stop Human Trafficking and Abuse‘ event held at St. Andrew’s. Unfortunately, the group was small and Mike McDonnell discusses this in his article on Spiritual Complacency elsewhere in this issue.

Those present learned from trafficking and abuse victims how trafficking and abuse starts, and what can be done to help the victims. It wasn’t easy listening to the harrowing life stories of people directly impacted by these devastating crimes. It did, however, serve to strengthen our resolve to continue raising awareness, and take action wherever we can to fight human trafficking and abuse.

The Small but determined audience for the Stop Human Trafficking and Abuse event held at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City, Missouri. Image credit: Gary Allman

The day was opened by Jeff Butcher, National President of The Brotherhood of St. Andrew co-sponsors of the event with The Diocese of West Missouri.

Brotherhood of St. Andrew President, Jeff Butcher at the Stop Human Trafficking and Abuse event held at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City, Missouri. Image credit: Gary Allman

The all-day event featured four sessions.

Slavery, the Bible, and Gritty Evangelism – The Rev. Dr. Benjamin Thomas from the Saint Francis foundation. Slavery is seen all over the Bible, and the Bible has been used (wrongly) to defend this practice. Fr. Benjamin explained how a biblical theology of humanity stands against any practice of slavery, including human trafficking, and why fighting human trafficking should be viewed as an act of “gritty evangelism.”

The Rev. Dr. Benjamin Thomas, Director of Church Relations for the Saint Francis Foundation refutes talks about the response to slavery expressed in the Bible. Image credit: Gary Allman

Hiding in Plain Sight – Greg Holtmeyer. One in six males are sexually abused by the time they are eighteen. That means approximately twenty-five million males have been sexually abused in this country alone. There is no religion, education level, socioeconomic level that is immune from sexual predators. Greg shared his personal story of childhood sexual abuse, discussed the short term and long term effects of the sexual abuse of males both physical and emotional.

Greg Holtmeyer, Executive Director of The Phoenix Project, speaking of his experience as a victim of male sexual abuse at the Stop Human Trafficking and Abuse event held at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City, Missouri. Image credit: Gary Allman

Trafficking Survivor and victim advocate – Christine C. McDonald. Christine told us about the impact of her experience of 20 years as a sex trafficking victim. She began by telling us about her being ‘sold’ at the age of fourteen by her mother in exchange for lodging. Christine’s life-story is hard to listen to. Having escaped from human trafficking she is now an advocate for survivors.

Christine C. McDonald, Trafficking Survivor and victim advocate speaking about the impact of her experience of 20 years as a sex trafficking victim at the Stop Human Trafficking and Abuse event held at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City, Missouri. Image credit: Gary Allman

Sex Trafficking – Helen Taylor. Helen described the social and cultural underpinnings of sex trafficking as well as what is being done to abolish commercial sexual exploitation as a whole. She recounted her own personal experiences of helping people trapped in the sex industry.

Helen Taylor of Exodus Cry speaking at the Stop Human Trafficking and Abuse event held at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City, Missouri. Image credit: Gary Allman
Brotherhood of St. Andrew VP Social Justice, Mike McDonnell winding up the day. Image credit: Gary Allman

Gary Allman is Communications Director with The Diocese of West Missouri

Easter Vigil & Baptisms at Grace, Carthage

Easter Vigil and 150th anniversary celebration dinner at Grace, Carthage.

Gary Allman Two-minute read.   Resources

I’ve often said that working for the Church I am privileged to be present at key moments in people’s lives. Unexpectedly that happened at this year’s Easter Vigil service.

I was at Grace Church to get some pictures of the Easter Vigil (one of my favorite services) and the 150th anniversary celebration dinner that followed. I was hoping to capture some Easter Vigil candlelight pictures. Working against me was an early service with the sun streaming in through the windows.

Easter Vigil & Baptisms at Grace Episcopal Church Carthage, Missouri. Saturday April 20, 2019. Image credit: Gary Allman

On arrival I checked in with Fr. Steve and discovered the order of service was to be different to what I am used to, with the lighting of the Paschal candle taking place in the middle, and not at the start of the service. Excellent! Candles later, maybe it would be darker. Pre-warned on the non-standard service order, I studied the order of service to work out what was happening when. That was when I discovered there would also be baptisms. It was going to be a busy evening.

Waiting for the service to begin. Image credit: Gary Allman
Easter Vigil & Baptisms at Grace Episcopal Church Carthage, Missouri. Saturday April 20, 2019. Image credit: Gary Allman
Easter Vigil & Baptisms at Grace Episcopal Church Carthage, Missouri. Saturday April 20, 2019. Image credit: Gary Allman

Lighting the Candles

Preparing to light the Paschal candle – Easter Vigil & Baptisms at Grace Episcopal Church Carthage, Missouri. Saturday April 20, 2019. Image credit: Gary Allman
Lighting the candles. Saturday April 20, 2019. Image credit: Gary Allman
Easter Vigil. Saturday April 20, 2019. Image credit: Gary Allman

Baptisms

Baptisms at Grace Episcopal Church Carthage. Image credit: Gary Allman

What I wasn’t prepared for was a church filled with incense so thick you could hardly see from one end of the church to the other (thanks to the Thurifer, Kirby Newport). It was so thick that Donna Field told me her camera couldn’t focus.

I love chiaroscuro images and I saw a chance to produce a picture in a similar style if I risked taking the pictures of the baptisms into the light (and smoke). I’ll admit it took a long time to process those images, but it was worth the effort.

The Baptism of Persephone at Grace Episcopal Church, Carthage, Missouri. Image credit: Gary Allman
The Baptism of Owen at Grace Episcopal Church, Carthage, Missouri. Image credit: Gary Allman
Image credit: Gary Allman
The 360° – Not a maneuver I see often. Image credit: Gary Allman

150th Anniversary Dinner

Grace Carthage 150th Anniversary Celebrations – The first service of the community was held on April 20, 1869. Image credit: Gary Allman
Dining al fresco at Grace Carthage. Image credit: Gary Allman

After the service I was glad I took heed of Fr. Steve’s earlier email suggestion to ‘come hungry’ as I joined in with the celebration dinner for Grace’s 150th anniversary.

Gary Allman is Communications Director with The Diocese of West Missouri

Area Confirmations at Christ Church Boonville

On Saturday May 4, 2019, Christ Church, Boonville hosted diocesan Area Confirmations.

Donna Field One-minute read.   Resources
Confirmands and their families. Image credit: Donna Field

On Saturday May 4, 2019, Christ Church Episcopal hosted diocesan Area Confirmations. Taking part were members of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City; Calvary Episcopal Church, Sedalia and Christ Church Boonville.

Those Being Confirmed

  • St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City: Sophia Marien-Brovont, Carter Rostron.
  • Calvary Episcopal Church, Sedalia: Hannah Allcorn.
  • Christ Church, Boonville: Josephine Robb.
The Confirmands with Bishop Marty. Image credit: Donna Field
Candidate from St. Andrew’s Kansas City. Image credit: Donna Field
Candidate from St. Andrew’s Kansas City. Image credit: Donna Field
Candidate from Calvary, Sedalia. Image credit: Donna Field
Candidate from Christ Church, Boonville. Image credit: Donna Field

Ordinations to the Priesthood at St. Andrew’s Kansas City

Photographs: Donna Field and Mary Ann Teschan Five-minute read.   Resources

On Saturday May 11, 2019, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City hosted the Ordinations to the Sacred Order of Priests of the Rev. William Jeffrey Hurst, the Rev. Dr. Sean Kim, and the Rev. Marco Serrano.

If you want to know more about our new priests they all wrote about themselves when they were ordained into the diaconate.

Front row, (L-R): the Rev. Dr. Sean Kim, the Rev. Marco Serrano and the Rev. William Jeffrey Hurst. Image credit: Mary Ann Teschan
(L-R) Bishop Marty, the Rev. Dr. Sean Kim, the Rev. Marco Serrano, and the Rev. William Jeffrey Hurst. Image credit: Mary Ann Teschan
(L-R) Bishop Marty, the Rev. Dr. Sean Kim, the Rev. Marco Serrano, and the Rev. William Jeffrey Hurst. Image credit: Donna Field
The Rev. Dr. Sean Kim, and family. Image credit: Mary Ann Teschan
The Rev. William Jeffrey Hurst and family. Image credit: Donna Field
The Rev. Marco Serrano and family. Image credit: Donna Field

Area Confirmations at St. James, Springfield

On Saturday, May 18, St. James Episcopal Church, Springfield hosted diocesan Area Confirmations.

Gary Allman Three-minute read.   Resources
Area Confirmations at St. James Episcopal Church, Springfield. Image credit: Gary Allman

On Saturday, May 18, St. James Episcopal Church, Springfield hosted diocesan Area Confirmations. Churches presenting candidates: All Saints’ Episcopal Church, West Plains; St. Alban’s in the Ozarks, Bolivar; Grace Episcopal Church, Carthage; St. James Episcopal Church, Springfield; St. John’s Episcopal Church, Springfield; St. Philip’s Episcopal Church Joplin; Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church, Branson.

Those Being Confirmed

  • St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, Bolivar: Olivia Cox, Sarah Cox, Lily Shepard, Amanda Whatley, Matthew Whatley.
  • All Saints’ Episcopal Church, West Plains: Michelle Foster, Jeff Marloew, John Marloew, Nels Portincaso.
  • Grace Episcopal Church, Carthage: Joe Osborn, Sharon Osborn, Ashley Rouse, Norman Rouse.
  • St. James Episcopal Church, Springfield: Steve Haberman, Astry Rivera-Amigon
  • St. John’s Episcopal Church, Springfield: Gabriel Delgado, Britaney Johnson, Sherrie Searl
  • St. Philip’s Episcopal Church, Joplin: Mark Kiger, Glenda Kiger
  • Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church, Branson: David Britt, Cheryl Hart.

Those Being Received

  • St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, Bolivar: Gale Roberts.

St. Alban’s in the Ozarks Episcopal Church, Bolivar

Candidates from St. Alban’s in the Ozarks Episcopal Church, Bolivar. Image credit: Gary Allman

All Saints’ Episcopal Church, West Plains

Candidates from All Saints’ Episcopal Church, West Plains. Image credit: Gary Allman

Grace Episcopal Church, Carthage

Candidates from Grace Episcopal Church, Carthage. Image credit: Gary Allman

St. James Episcopal Church, Springfield

Candidates and partners from St. James Episcopal Church, Springfield. Image credit: Gary Allman

St. John’s Episcopal Church, Springfield

Candidates from St. John’s Episcopal Church, Springfield. Image credit: Gary Allman

Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church, Branson

Candidates and friends from Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church, Branson. Image credit: Gary Allman

Gary Allman is Communications Director with The Diocese of West Missouri

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Ordinations to the Priesthood at Christ Church, Springfield

Gary Allman Two-minute read.   Resources

On Saturday, May 18, 2019, Christ Episcopal Church Springfield hosted the Ordination to the Sacred Order of Priests of the Rev. Bradley A. Heuett and the Rev. Chandler C. Jackson III.

If you want to know more about our new priests, they all wrote about themselves when they were ordained into the diaconate.

L-R. The Rev. Bradley Heuett, Bishop Marty, and The Rev. Chandler Jackson. Image credit: Gary Allman
The Rev. Brad Heuett (Left) and the Rev. Chandler Jackson (right) with Bishop Marty Image credit: Gary Allman
Fr. Brad Heuett and family. Image credit: Gary Allman

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Area Confirmations at St. Mary’s, Kansas City

Donna Field One-minute read.   Resources
Area Confirmations at St. Mary’s, Kansas City. Image credit: Donna Field

On Saturday June 1, St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City hosted diocesan Area Confirmations. Churches presenting candidates: St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City; St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City; St. Mary Magdalene Episcopal Church, Belton; St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City; The Episcopal Church of the Redeemer, Kansas.

Those Being Confirmed

  • St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City: Sophie Jewell Angilan, Alison Cheyenne Cole, Andrew David Garrison, Adam James, Kimberly James, Erin Graham, Freddie Graham, Charlotte Rhys Hamilton, John Honnold, Damon Mos, Medill Norden, Charles Penner, Jordan Pindell, Garrett Rigsby.
  • St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City: Zachary Bushnell, Seth Jones, Christopher Steinauer, Anna Stokes, Aaron Wheeler.
  • St. Mary Magdalene Episcopal Church, Belton: Patryk Hernandez, Suki Hernandez, Lauren Hurlburt, Katie McKain,
    Maggie McKain, Matthew Wormington.
  • St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City: Melissa Hill, Margaret Kissick, Christina McLewin, Kayleigh Nichols, John Whitehead
  • The Episcopal Church of the Redeemer, Kansas City: Anne Cannon, Kylee Cannon, Marie Evans, Rachel Gyore, Joanne McGrath,
    Rodney McGrath, Jerusha Staffs, Vince Staggs.

Those Being Received

  • St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City: Ashley Bergus, Jared Miller, Mark Patterson, Genevieve Rigsby, Kathleen West, Geri Wurth.
  • St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City: Waylon Glick, Patty Petet.
  • St. Mary Magdalene Episcopal Church, Belton: Jane Skaer.
  • St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City: Rebecca Forsyth.

Those Being Reaffirmed

  • St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City: Ritchie Patterson, Anne Woodyard, Joseph Woodyard.

St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City

Candidates from: St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City. Image credit: Donna Field

St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City

Candidates from: St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City. Image credit: Donna Field

St. Mary Magdalene Episcopal Church, Belton

Candidates from: St. Mary Magdalene Episcopal Church, Belton. Image credit: Donna Field

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City

Candidates from: St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City. Image credit: Donna Field

The Episcopal Church of the Redeemer, Kansas City

Candidates from: The Episcopal Church of the Redeemer, Kansas City. Image credit: Donna Field

Christ Church Lexington’s 175th Anniversary

On Sunday June 9, Christ Episcopal Church Lexington celebrated its 175th anniversary.

Abigail Tempel Three-minute read.   Resources
Christ Church banner for 175th anniversary. Image credit: Tim Ross

Bishop Marty and his wife, Donna, joined members of Christ Church Lexington, the Lexington community, and members of the Central Deanery and other diocesan churches on Pentecost, June 9, 2019 to celebrate the 175th Anniversary of the congregation’s establishment by Bishop Jackson Kemper in 1844.

Guests and congregation, Christ Church Lexington – 175th Anniversary. Image credit: Tim Ross

Bishop Marty celebrated Holy Eucharist in a special afternoon service, assisted by Fr. Bill Fasel, Priest in Charge, Fr. Doug Johnson, and Fr. Tom Punzo. Prior to the service, Bagpiper Jim Higgins of Kansas City played outside church entrance for the guests and general public. The clergy then processed from outside into the church led to the altar by the bagpiper, playing the bagpipes in full highland dress including kilt and sporran.

Bagpiper Jim Higgins, Pastor John Swisher, Lexington residents, and Donna Field – 175th Anniversary. Image credit: Tim Ross

Music for the service was provided by Perry Beam, organist, Beverly Roggenkamp, Mike Esser, Raymond Beam and Hank Beam as our choir members, and Patrick Berry and David Bohling, additional musicians.

During the service Lexington Mayor Fred Wiedner presented a proclamation expressing the City of Lexington’s appreciation for the contributions of Christ Church to the life and history of the city over the generations. Senior Warden Beverly Roggenkamp, Bishop Marty and Fr. Bill accepted the proclamation on behalf of Christ Church.

Mayor Fred Wiedner reading the proclamation. Christ Church Lexington – 175th Anniversary. Image credit: Tim Ross

After the service, church members and guests enjoyed refreshments at a catered reception in the Common Room, prepared by Lisa Ethington. Vestments from the nineteenth century, historic documents and photographs and other church memorabilia were on display. Tables were decorated with red ribbons and notecards with interesting “Did you know?” facts about the church, such as the original cost for construction, number of bricks used in the structure, and that the 1871 portable pipe organ is the oldest organ in continuous use in the state of Missouri, to mention just a few. Copies of a recently revised pamphlet containing a history and photographs of the church, its stained-glass windows, and altar vessels and banners, were available for all who attended.

Many of our guests then went on to enjoy a superb concert “Rally ‘Round the Flag” presented by the Lexington Wind Symphony. Bagpiper Jim Higgins joined the symphony, playing additional music appropriate to the concert theme. Christ Church members were especially appreciative of the Wind Symphony graciously changing the time of their concert so that the musicians we share could be available to perform at our 175th Anniversary.

Christ Church Lexington – 175th Anniversary. Image credit: Tim Ross

It was a memorable day for all, with the anticipated rain holding off, insuring a bright, sunny day, full of warm hospitality, catching up with former parishioners and meeting new friends and, hopefully, new congregants.

Abigail Tempel is the parish administrator, office secretary, and clerk of the vestry at Christ Church Lexington.

Seeing the Face of God in Each Other – South

June saw the re-scheduling of the ‘Seeing the Face of God in Each Other’ workshops that were postponed due to bad weather earlier in the year.

Gary Allman Eight-minute read.   Resources
Cheryl Cementina leading an exercise to illustrate privilege at the ‘Seeing the Face of God in Each Other’ workshop on June 22, 2019. Image credit: Gary Allman

Despite working for the diocese since 2014, I have somehow missed attending any diversity training. Keen to remedy the situation I signed up for the rescheduled ‘Seeing the Face of God in Each Other’ workshop held on June 22 at St. Philip’s, Joplin.

The day’s sessions were led by Shirley Bolden: St. Augustine’s, Kansas City; Cheryl Cementina: St. Andrew’s Kansas City (Shirley and Cheryl are the co-chairs of the Diversity and Reconciliation Commission); Drew Brown: Christ Church, St. Joseph, and Fr. Chas Marks: St. Augustine’s, Kansas City.

This interactive workshop was attended by twenty people from churches in the Southern Deanery: St. Philip’s, Joplin; Grace, Carthage; St. John’s, Springfield; St. Mark’s, Kimberling City; and St. Stephen’s, Monett (apologies if I’ve left anyone out).

The session started with a very simple exercise. We were asked to write down a single hope and fear for the day. I’ll share mine (from memory).

  • Hope: To learn and understand.
  • Fear: That I’m not as enlightened as I would like to think I am.

Both proved to be correct, which in the case of my fear, is unfortunate.

Cheryl Cementina leading an exercise to illustrate privilege at the ‘Seeing the Face of God in Each Other’ workshop on June 22, 2019. What you can’t see – Fr. Frank Sierra and Shirley Bolden at the back. Image credit: Gary Allman

The workshop was illuminating, humbling, gave a lot of historical context, and addressed the ‘knee-jerk’ reactions to the label of ‘privilege’ among others.

For some afternoon physical exercise we looked at the issue of privilege by arranging ourselves in a line across the back of the room and then taking a step every time we could positively answer a question posed by the facilitator, Cheryl Clementina. Fr. Frank and Shirley Bolden were left standing at the back of the room. I was surprised to find that as a Legal Alien, I didn’t progress too far either.

Drew Brown discussing institutional racism at the ‘Seeing the Face of God in Each Other’ workshop on June 22, 2019. Image credit: Gary Allman

I am sure that everyone present came away with something to think about, and the knowledge and acceptance that there is a lot of work still to be done; both personally and institutionally.

The next workshop session (June 29 in Kansas City) is fully booked, but more sessions will be held. I strongly urge all people in church leadership to take part, whether they think that they and their churches are ‘enlightened’ or not. Keep an eye out for announcements of future workshops in the eSpirit and on Facebook.

In case you missed the advertisements for the workshop, I’ve reproduced a (lightly edited) copy of the text below:

Working for justice is difficult at best, excruciatingly difficult at worst. Most of the time it seems as if the more exact word for this long-hoped-for state of being is ‘just-us’ and even ‘just-me.’ It is one thing for churches, and yes, this is true of many denominations, to pass resolutions that repudiate this blight on our nation and repent this personal and institutional sin, to say that we are against racism and exclusion, and that we are working for justice.

It is one thing for us to say that we decry the artificial and illegal barriers erected between those who have power and those who seek their rights, between those who enjoy the rich economic resources of this country and those who cry themselves to sleep from continuous hunger and deprivation. It is another thing altogether to be the seeker and the advocate and the trainer and the record keeper and, and … Only the super strong can labor in that vineyard alone. Only the robotic can be immune to the waves of fatigue, self-doubt and hopelessness that frequently assail us as we work to actualize that which everyone professes to want without the pain of getting there.

Taken from the event publicity.

Finally, many thanks to the good people of St. Philip’s for their generous hospitality.

The Ordination of Jeffrey Neal Stevenson

On December 12, 2018 Jeffrey Stevenson was ordained into the priesthood at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City, Missouri.

Fr. Jeff Stevenson Five-minute read.   Resources
Bishop Marty and Fr. Jeff. Image credit: Gary Allman

My husband Noah and I are recent transplants to the Kansas City area from Alexandria, Virginia outside of Washington DC. We came to Missouri to accept my first call as the new Assistant Rector at St. Andrew’s, Kansas City. I recently graduated from the Virginia Theological Seminary (VTS) after a long-deferred call to the priesthood.

I grew up in the Church of Latter-Day Saints (LDS) in Utah. I don’t remember knowing anyone that wasn’t LDS until I was a teenager and so my notion of what it meant to have faith was tied to that single tradition. This all changed in 1994 when I enlisted in the Navy. In the military my world opened to new realms of possibilities, to new ways of seeing the world, and to new ways of understanding what it meant to “have faith.” It was while I was in the Navy that I came to understand that faith took on many forms and I found myself exploring what it means to believe in God. Looking back on those years, I recognize now that I was being called to ordained life, but at that time I was not ready to hear or follow God’s call.

When I left active duty military, I decided to return home to Ogden, Utah where I begin working on a degree in Social Work. That plan was interrupted by the events of 9/11. My training in the Navy was in intelligence and satellite imagery, these skill sets were suddenly in high demand. I was recalled to active duty and served as an imagery analyst at the Office of Naval intelligence in Washington DC. When the yearlong recall to active duty came to an end, I accepted a position with a consulting firm in the DC area. It was not social work, but it was a way to make an impact in the world, so for the next 13 years I worked as a National Security & Intelligence consultant.

After many years of discernment, I realized I could no longer ignore the call to ordained life. In 2015 Noah and I decided it was time and so I left the intelligence community to enroll in the Master of Divinity Program at the VTS. During seminary I explored my passion for ministry in the context of trauma, writing my thesis entitled “Confession and the Moral Injuries of War.” I also worked as a chaplain at the local hospital, served as the chaplain to the Alexandria Police Department, and began working on Veterans ministries. Academically, I discovered a love of Hebrew and Aramaic; studying deeper meaning in some of my favorite Old Testament stories through translation. Most importantly, my call to walk with all of God’s people has driven me to explore my passion for the ministries of preaching, pastoral care, and community engagement.

Image credit: Gary Allman

Though we have lived in the Washington, DC area for over 15 years, Noah and I are both excited about this new adventure in Kansas City. We are thrilled to be joining St. Andrew’s and The Diocese of West Missouri family.

Meet Mother Terry Deokaran, All Saints’ West Plains, Missouri

On February 26, 2019 Mother Terry Deokaran was installed as rector at All Saints’ Episcopal Church, West Plains, Missouri.

The Rev. Terry Deokaran Five-minute read.   Resources

You may be asking, “Who is this Mother Terry (Teresa) Deokaran from the Diocese of Western Kansas, and how did she get to be rector of All Saints’ Episcopal Church in West Plains, Missouri?” Let me see if I can give you a peek into me.

The people of All Saint’s Episcopal Church, West Plains, Missouri. The installation of the Rev. Teresa Deokaran as rector on February 26, 2019. Image credit: Donna Field
Mother Terry Deokaran. Image: Facebook.com

I am a unique woman of 60 years in love with life and God. I am a woman transformed, as are many of you, through loss and love. I am single, divorced 12 years, and I have two children: Sean, 33, in Cincinnati, Ohio, and Melissa, 30, in New Orleans, La. I have no grandchildren as yet. My likes include: good food, good wine, chocolate, a good book, conversation, antique shops, coffee shops, outdoor markets, pottery, plants, rocks, old buildings/barns, old churches, lovely liturgy, and God’s beautiful outdoors!

I grew up in the middle of the cornfields in the small town of Mt. Carmel, Illinois. I was baptized at age 16. I attended college in Louisiana and graduated in 1980, the same year that I was married. My married life took me to Guyana, South America (my ex-husband’s home country) and to Hammond, Louisiana.

Mother Terry Deokaran, at All Saints’ Episcopal Church, West Plains, Missouri. Image: Facebook.com

My faith journey has taken me from the Disciples of Christ Church to the Missouri Synod Lutheran Church and to the Roman Catholic Church. For 15 years following my Confirmation into Catholicism in 1998, Christ touched my soul profoundly. I was impacted by the preaching and love-filled ways of Dominican friars and sisters. I pursued and completed theological studies at Loyola Institute for Ministry in New Orleans from 2006-2010. From 2008-2011 I was in discernment with Sisters of Peace, O.P. In 2010 I moved from Louisiana to Kansas. In 2010 I undertook and completed in 2013 a three year Spiritual Direction Program at Heartland Center for Spirituality in Great Bend, Kansas, all the while working as Pastoral Minister at the Catholic Church of Barber County, Kansas, a cluster of 3 sister churches.

It was in December of 2013 that the gentle voice of God laid on my heart the thought of the Episcopal Church. As a Roman Catholic lay woman I had always desired to be at the Altar as the Roman priests were. I listened to God’s calling and I entered a chapter that changed my life. I was received into All Saints’ Episcopal Church (Notice the name!), Pratt, Kansas, on June 12, 2014. I completed a year of Anglican studies at BKSM (Bishop Kemper School of Ministry) in Topeka, Kansas. On December 12, 2015 I was ordained a deacon and on July 9, 2016, a priest. During my period of Postulancy and studies I worked full time at Larrison Mortuaries in Medicine Lodge and Pratt, Kansas. From 2016 – 2018 I served as Vicar of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Medicine Lodge, Kansas and worked full time as Manager of South Wind Thrift Shop in Pratt, Kansas.

Sisters and Brothers, God initiated and I responded. In the fall of 2018 the Spirit moved again … in the parishioners of All Saints’ Episcopal Church of West Plains, Missouri who were seeking a priest to shepherd them … and in me, a priest open to the awareness of God’s next step in my journey and seeking a family to serve and spiritually guide.

The installation of Mother Terry at All Saint’s West Plains. February 26, 2019 Image credit: Donna Field

May the meditations of my heart attuned to the Holy Spirit direct my words and actions as Mother to my new family of All Saints!

Bishop’s Day at Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral

Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral, hosted the northern Bishop’s Day event on March 9 this year.

Gary Allman Two-minute read.   Resources
Josh Trader leading a discussion on creating a safe church. Bishop’s Day at Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral. Image credit: Gary Allman
Canon Steve Opens The Day – Bishop’s Day at Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral. Image credit: Gary Allman

Gary Allman is Communications Director with The Diocese of West Missouri

Christian Formation

New Christian Formation resources have been developed and are now available.

Kim Snodgrass One-minute read.   Resources
Christian Formation Booth at Diocesan Convention Image: Gary Allman

We want you to get excited about formation! The Christian Formation Office is here to provide the support you need for Children, Youth, Young Adults, Adults and Generations in community together. 

Click on Christian Formation at diowestmo.org to find a collection of recommended resources and tools. Our intent is to simplify your research and organize the wealth of information available online today into a single source for individuals, families and congregations.

Kim Snodgrass (second from left) with delegates from Grace Carthage at the 2018 Diocesan Convention. Image: Gary Allman

The Ministry Handbook and Confirmation Guide introduced during convention are included!

In addition to managing the resources of this website, the Christian Formation Office is here to walk with you. Let us help you discover the unique tools you are looking for that will help you incorporate a philosophy of formational ministry and serve Christ. Please contact us at  formation@diowestmo.org  and let us know how we can further support you.  

If you have resource reviews, suggestions or can offer up a “best practice” to help others, please send them to Kim Snodgrass.

Kim Snodgrass is Assistant to the Bishop for Christian Formation..

2018 Gathering Presentations

Brief notes and useful links relating to the three Diocesan Convention Gathering presentations.

Five-minute read.   Resources

What We’re Learning About The Episcopal Church That Can Help Us Grow Spiritually

The Rev. Jay Sidebotham discusses where the church is going. Image: Gary Allman

The church, that wonderful and sacred mystery, is a community brought together by grace, as gift, not because of what church members have done, but because of what God has done in Christ. And the grace is just the starting point. The story doesn’t end there. As Annie Lamott says, the grace of God loves us enough to meet us where we are, but loves us too much to leave us there. So let me pose a few questions we must ask, prompted by the letter to the Ephesians: What is the way of life that lies before us? What is that way for our congregations, for our leaders, lay and clergy? What is the way for each person’s spiritual journey?

Resources

Inspiring Legacy Giving

John Hoskins provides information on establishing legacy giving. Image: Gary Allman

No additional information on legacy giving was available at the time of publishing. We’ll update this article when details are available.

Human Trafficking and the Sex Industry:  A Moral Challenge For The Church

Brittany Zampella details the horrific number of people involved in human trafficking. Image: Donna Field

Our Diocesan Convention was blessed to have Brittany Zampella as our speaker on Sex Trafficking.   She delivered an impassioned presentation imploring individuals to become aware of the “insidious injustice” of sex trafficking and the damage it does to trafficked victims, their families and our society.  Brittany emphasized the importance of abolishing the entire sex industry if we hope to rid ourselves of the horrific evil of young girls and women trafficked for the sole purpose of greed and male sexual gratification. 

Attendees were leaving the room after her presentation shaking their heads in disbelief that the problem of sex trafficking was so severe. Bravo and thanks to Brittany for a making a complex subject understandable. A  job well done. 

Mike McDonnell

Diocesan Convention in Pictures

The people and events of the 129th convention of The Diocese of West Missouri.

Five-minute read.   Resources
Friday, November 2. It wouldn’t be a diocesan convention if we didn’t take a group picture of all the assembled clergy (and clergy to be). Image: Gary Allman

People

Donna Parker, St. Mary Magdalene, and the Rev. Kary Man, Priest in Charge at Trinity Independence. Image: Gary Allman

The Gathering

The Rev. Jay Sidebotham discusses where the church is going. Image: Gary Allman

Convention Eucharist and Ordinations

Opening Eucharist of the 129th Convention of the Diocese of West Missouri. Image: Gary Allman

Banquet

Convention Banquet. Image: Donna Field

Business Session

Fr. Sid gets elected (we’re not sure what for…) Image: Gary Allman

Bishop’s Ball and Youth Awards 2018

Gary Allman Five-minute read.   Resources
Award Winners Image: Gary Allman

Christ Episcopal Church Springfield hosted this year’s Bishop’s Ball on Saturday November 3. There was good food, awards, and dancing to be enjoyed.

Awards

Above and Beyond Youth – Liam McKeown. Presented by Meredith Seaton. Image: Gary Allman
Outstanding Adult Volunteer – Frank Miller. Presented by Rosie Garza and Jayme Trader. Image: Gary Allman
Outstanding Youth – Jayme Trader, presented by Spencer Orr. Image: Gary Allman
Leaving a Legacy – Natalie Telep, presented by Alexandra Connors. Image: Gary Allman
Outstanding YMC Member – Amanda Colburn, presented by Krista Heuett. Image: Gary Allman
Above and Beyond Adult – Alexandra Connors, presented by Josh Trader. Image: Gary Allman
Purple Cross awarded to Fr. Jonathan Callison, St. Paul’s Kansas City. Presented by Amanda Colburn. Image: Gary Allman

Food

Dancing

Awards over, it’s time for dancing. Image: Gary Allman

Gary Allman is Communications Director with The Diocese of West Missouri.

Resources

Back to Contents

New Deacons

Five transitional deacons were ordained at the opening Eucharist of the 129th Convention of The Diocese of West Missouri. Find out more about them.

Gary Allman 15 minute read.   Resources
Friday, November 2. (L-R) The Rev. Bradley Heuett, the Rev. Marco Serrano, the Rev. Chandler Jackson, the Rev. Sean Kim, and the Rev Jeff Hurst with the Rt. Rev. Martin S. Field at the opening Eucharist of the 129th Convention of The Diocese of West Missouri. Image: Gary Allman

The Rev. Brad Heuett

Friday, November 2. Ordination to the diaconate of Bradley Heuett (Nearest to the camera), William Hurst, Chandler Jackson, Sean Kim, Marco Serrano at the opening Eucharist of the 129th Convention of The Diocese of West Missouri. Image: Gary Allman

I was born in Trenton, Missouri where I spent most of my growing years. I moved to Springfield in 1998 to further my higher education at Southwest Missouri State University now known as Missouri State University. While attending classes, I was fortunate to meet my wife Krista of eighteen years. We have been truly blessed by God who has given us two boys Jacob (16) and Hunter (13). We currently reside in Ozark and enjoy movies, games, and experiencing new cuisines.

One of the most important aspects of life that I hold dear is knowledge, and I think that we should always look for educational opportunities. I would consider myself a professional student, and I find myself fulfilled while sitting in a classroom. I have attended many higher-level institutions in search of knowledge and even more programs which offer certifications in a wide array of topics. I have acquired degrees in communication, respiratory therapy, and general education. The licenses, certifications, and training that I have been fortunate to attain range from Presbyteral studies, conflict and dispute resolution, mediation, Certified Respiratory Therapist, CPR instructor, and heavy track operator.

Along with my education, I have also had broad employment experiences. I have worked in many construction fields, sales, education, combat arms, and medical. My most prominent employment experience came while serving in the U.S. Army. In 2003, I enlisted and deployed to Ar Ramadi, Iraq as a Combat Engineer, and after returning home, I changed jobs to Respiratory Therapy. I finished my military career working with patients at General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri.

Not long afterward, I received what I know now as my call to ministry. In a split second, I was overcome with and became aware of all of the suffering, strife, and distress of God’s children as well as the anger I was holding in my own heart. In that moment of desperation and with tears in my eyes, I dropped to my knees and prayed for God’s guidance. The next day my search began for a reason for what I saw and felt. It took time, but it didn’t take long for me to be made aware of my path and that with God’s help, I can make a difference. I am most excited to begin my new career as a clergy member of the Episcopal church while learning how I can serve the less fortunate and spread the love of God wherever I am called.

The Rev. Jeff Hurst

Deacons Jeff Hurst,Chandler Jackson, Sean Kim, Bradley Heuett, and Marco Serrano prepare to dismiss those in attendance at the opening Eucharist of the 129th Convention of The Diocese of West Missouri. Image: Gary Allman

I am originally from Southern, Illinois and grew up in a small town of Coulterville, Illinois which had a population of 1,200 souls. My family was Methodist, and I came to experience Jesus Christ at a young age. However, it was not until the end of my junior year in high school that I took my personal discipleship seriously. Through the guidance of my Methodist pastor, Rev. Ralph Anderson, I accepted a call from God to pastoral ministry in 1974. After graduating from high school, I attended a bible college, a liberal arts college, and finally seminary, and began serving small parishes in the United Methodist Church. I served seven churches in the UMC over a span of 17 years. In 2002, my family and I were tired of the mandatory and constant relocating, so I left the UMC. .

My wife Brenda and I moved to the Kansas City area in 2006 and worked briefly with a church ministry in overseas missions until 2009. We both began working for the Park Hill School District in 2007 and continue working there today.

Having sensed a call to return to pastoral ministry for many years, in late 2014 my wife Brenda and I began exploring the Anglican way of life and worship. We found our way to St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City, Missouri in August of 2015, and were confirmed in November by Bishop Marty. I began my studies at BKSM in September of 2015 and graduated in May of 2018. It was thrilling to be ordained as a transitional deacon at our recent diocesan convention!

In the next 6 months, I look forward to being ordained a priest in Christ’s holy church where I can better magnify the Sacramental nature of worship, daily Christian life, and ministry. I can’t forget that John Wesley, the founder of the Methodist societies, was an ordained Anglican priest his entire life and ministry. In a way, I feel I will have come full circle when I’m ordained a priest in the Episcopal Church.

I deeply appreciate the acceptance and love we have experienced from the members at St. Mary’s Church as well as from Christ Church in St. Joseph where I’m privileged to serve for a while as a transitional deacon.

The Rev. Chandler Jackson

The Rev. Chandler Jackson gives Communion to the Rev. Paula Lively. Image: Gary Allman

Like many, my path to ordination was not a simple, straightforward journey. It took many twists and turns. My father was an Episcopal priest, graduating from seminary when I was six years old. Growing up, I was very active in the church, but wanted no part of ministry. In fact, I told God I would do anything else: music, teach, anything but pastoral ministry. Ah, but our God has a sense of humor.

During my brief stint in the Navy, I met a young lady who was of another denomination. Like most guys, I followed her and ended up becoming a minister of music in that denomination. That was fine, no pastoral ministry. Of course, I was asked to take a church, but I declined; Not my calling. After her death at a young age, I found my way back to the Episcopal Church and served the church in many capacities: music, Sunday School teacher, and a whole lot more. I worked at colleges and universities for 30 years as a librarian and professor (that teaching thing again) and sang in professional choirs, but avoided pastoral work at all costs.

Then came a fateful Monday evening. I was at the church to lead evening prayer. As happened occasionally, no one showed up, so I said the Office by myself. As I was going around turning off lights and locking doors, I felt restrained from leaving the sanctuary. I sat down in the back of the church and was puzzled. After some prayer, I left the sanctuary and made it into the parish hall before I was compelled to return to the sanctuary and more prayer. After third try and finally telling God I would talk to my rector the next day, I felt free to leave. God had finally gotten through my thick skull and let me know I couldn’t run from ministry any more.

Due to several factors, I moved to Springfield and began attending Christ Episcopal Church. After some time, I felt it was time to meet with Fr. Ken Chumbley, our rector, and let him in on God’s plan for my life. After going through the discernment process, I enrolled in BKSM in the Anglican Studies program. A little weird for a cradle Episcopalian, but my ministry formation had been in another denomination, so it made sense. I graduated last spring and am glad to be finally pursuing the vocation God called me to decades ago.

The Rev. Sean Kim

The Rt. Rev. Martin S. Field lays hands upon Sean Kim Image: Gary Allman

My path to the ordained ministry has been a long, circuitous journey. I first felt the call in college and marched off to seminary upon graduation. But while in seminary, I soon discovered that my understanding of ministry was narrow and limited; I basically thought that all I had to do was preach once a week (my Presbyterian background may be partly to blame). When I learned about the other responsibilities, especially providing pastoral care to the sick and dying, I realized that I lacked the emotional maturity and commitment. At the same time, I was drawn more to academics and decided to pursue a career as a historian.

While in Boston for graduate school, I found my spiritual home in the Episcopal Church. Trinity Church was near my apartment, and I fell in love with the beautiful liturgy. I eventually joined the Church of the Advent, an Anglo-Catholic parish. The liturgy first drew me to the Episcopal Church, but far more important for me than even the liturgy were the people whom I met. Nowhere else had I experienced the kind of profound and authentic sense of community that I encountered in the Episcopal Church. Here was the Body of Christ.

Fourteen years ago I returned to the Kansas City area, where I had grown up, to teach Asian and world history at the University of Central Missouri. St. Andrew’s in Kansas City became my home parish. As I became involved in the life of the church through its many ministries, I began to feel the call to ordained ministry again. This time, however, the call came through those around me – the voices of fellow parishioners and the clergy. After an extended period of discernment, I decided to take up the call to the bi-vocational priesthood.

In preparation, I studied at the Bishop Kemper School for Ministry (BKSM), focusing on Anglicanism and other areas missing in my previous seminary education. It was exciting to be in school again. I especially appreciated the intellectual rigor and the powerful bonds of community at BKSM. Another formative experience was my Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) training at Saint Luke’s Hospital in Kansas City, where I learned what it means to provide pastoral care at some of life’s most difficult moments.

Before being ordained to the transitional diaconate at diocesan convention, I served as an intern at Christ Church Warrensburg. Currently, I am serving as a deacon at St. Anne’s in Lee’s Summit. It has been an extraordinary blessing to share in the life of the loving, vibrant communities at St. Andrew’s, Christ Church, and St. Anne’s. Looking ahead, I am not sure where I will be serving after my ordination to the priesthood; I am open to the Spirit’s leading.

The Rev. Marco Serrano

Marco Serrano (nearest to the camera). Image: Donna Field

Being raised in the church, I first discerned a call to ordained ministry when I was 17 years old. I was not a member of the Episcopal Church at the time, and I really did not have any idea what ordained ministry might mean for me or my life. And so, while I knew that I loved God and very much wanted to serve the Church, the path to ordained ministry was unsurprisingly not a straight line.

Part of my calling and vocation has been a deep and longstanding desire to serve at-risk and vulnerable populations, and I took that passion with me to law school. While I am grateful for the chance to study and practice law — and my hope is to integrate all my training into a singular vocation — I sensed after law school that I was yearning for something deeper.

God was patiently guiding me to the beauty of Anglicanism. During law school, I lived across the street from an Episcopal church. At my first job, I again lived across the street from an Episcopal church. And while it took a bit of time, I eventually got the hint and fell in love with the liturgy and reverence of Anglican worship. As I did so, my call to ministry was reawakened.

By the grace of God, I have re-learned and remembered that the harvest is indeed plentiful, and that the joys and sacrifices of ordained ministry form a very high call. It has been a singular privilege to join The Diocese of West Missouri in its mission to be God’s loving and beloved community in this time and place. And I anticipate both challenges and triumphs as I seek to serve and love the people of God. Soli Deo gloria.   

(L-R) The Rev. Marco Serrano, the Rev. Sean Kim,., the Rev. Chandler Jackson, the Rev. Bradley Heuett, and the Rev Jeff Hurst. Image: Donna Field

Fall Confirmations at Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral

Gary Zumwalt Two-minute read.   Resources
Saturday October 20. Area Confirmations at Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral. Image: Gary Zumwalt

On Saturday October 20, 2018, Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral, Kansas City hosted diocesan Area Confirmations. Taking part were members of Calvary Episcopal Church, Sedalia; Church of the Good Shepherd, Kansas City; St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City; Episcopal Church of the Redeemer, Kansas City.

Those Being Confirmed

  • Calvary Episcopal Church, Sedalia: Stephanie Ellen Hull.
  • Church of the Good Shepherd, Kansas City: Russell Suhr, Norman Todd.
  • St. Mary’s Kansas City: Clarence Franklin, Jr., Chad Hunter.
  • Church of the Redeemer: Travis Whetstine, Julieann Hunter.

Those Being Received

  • St. Mary’s Kansas City: E.L. Darling, Michael Ritzel.
  • Church of the Redeemer: Virginia Blevins, John Blevins, Shelli Pierjok.

Gary Zumwalt is a member of the Church of the Resurrection, Blue Springs. He volunteers his time and talents to document diocesan events in pictures.