Racial Reconciliation

Juneteenth — A personal reflection

Four-minute read. Stephanie Hasty reflects on Juneteenth, — June 19, the date that Major General Gordon Granger read General Order 3 to the people of Galveston, Texas. It was then, two years after The Emancipation Proclamation was signed, that every enslaved person in the United States was free and knew it.

Justice: Indigenous People

One-Minute read. Love is something we do. Let us refuse to demonize those who disagree with us. Let us try our best to make our words and actions a witness to the world. Because, the love that acts to care for vulnerable people imparts the love God has for all.

Executive Council advances church’s work on racial justice issues at June virtual meeting

Six-minute read. Themes of racial justice, including the experience of people of color within The Episcopal Church, the persecution of indigenous peoples in North America and plans to extend and magnify the church’s existing truth and reconciliation efforts, dominated the work of the church’s Executive Council during its June 25-28 virtual meeting.

1968 Holy Week Riots in Kansas City, Missouri

10-minute read. April 4, 1968, was a normal workday for me, starting at 8 a.m. and ending around 5:30 p.m. when I would rush in the door and plop down in front of the television for the evening news. At 6:01 p.m. that evening, the world changed for many in America and was on the verge of changing for me.

Juneteenth to become an official federal holiday

One-minute read. As federal employees are granted a paid holiday to celebrate Juneteenth, learn more about this commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States.

The [Mis]concept[ion] of Race

Two-Minute read. Learning transforms because it informs. February is Black History Month, celebrate in part by reading about the [Mis]concept[ion] of race, and open the way for conversation.

Episcopal Church House of Bishops July 2020: A Word on Protest and Federal Policing

Four-minute read. The House of Bishops met virtually July 28-29, 2020. The following statement was adopted on July 29. While the situation on the ground in Portland has changed, the bishops believe it is important to share their statement about protest and policing.

Note: the following information is presented in English and Spanish
Aviso: La siguiente información se presenta en inglés y en español

You Are In Good Company

Two-minute read. If you find being a follower of Christ in today’s world hard – you are in good company. This is not new, people have been facing challenges like those we face today since the beginning of Christianity.

Race and Diversity Resources for Adult Christian Formation

One-minute read. As Christians affirm the dignity of every human being; that all are created in the image of God and all are beloved. Here are some resources that can be used to spark conversation and understanding on this complex subject.

Racial reconciliation program from The Episcopal Church open to all

Two-minute read. July 28-30, 3-5 p.m. CDT, Online gathering.

Racial justice and healing leaders and practitioners across The Episcopal Church will gather to build community, craft strategy and equip each other for action during a series of “Becoming Beloved Community NOW” online gatherings.

Aviso: La siguiente información se presenta en inglés y en español

Anti-racism covenant launched

Three-minute read.Over the past month, 14 bishops of The Episcopal Church and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, including our bishop, the Rt. Rev. Martin S. Field, have worked together to produce an anti-racism covenant.

Pray on Troost

Two-minute read. On the evening of Juneteenth, Friday, June 19, Troost Avenue, Kansas City, became a focal point of unity when people of different faiths and races joined together in an hour-long event ‘Pray on Troost.’ Together they formed an estimated 10-mile long, socially distanced, prayer chain.

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